Search Results: "Noel Daniel"


BOOK REVIEW

NOEL by Tony Johnston
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"His impressionistic paintings are a fine match for the poem that serves as the text: Both seem to say that the hours of Christmas Eve rush by quickly in a blur of sensations too intense to last. (artist's note) (Picture book. 5-8)"
Impressionistic watercolor illustrations filled with blowing snow and blue-gray skies set a wintry tone in this poetic exploration focusing on the sounds and sights of Christmas Eve, such as a church bell ringing from "an icicle-pointed steeple." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL by Henning Mankell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"An ambitious, flawed but compelling addition to the Mankell canon."
A haunting novel by the Swedish mystery master, one that proceeds from the indelible to the inscrutable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NUTCRACKER NOEL by Kate McMullan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A delightful addition to the annals of young performers. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Noel dreams of being a star in a ``real'' ballet, but alas- -in her class production she's only a tree, while arch-rival Mia, of the winsome curls and doting mother, is a gingerbread doll. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOEL COWARD by Philip Hoare
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Serious scholarship also serves here as an act of cultural restitution for a gay hero. (32 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A full-scale life of the towering English songwriter and playwright. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEAR NOEL by Olivier Dunrea
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 6, 2000

"Satisfying to the last wordless page. (Picture book. 4-8)"
On Christmas Eve, the one night of the year that all the animals can gather together without fear, the creatures of the north woods await the arrival of Bear Noel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 3, 1992

"An intriguing study of a central figure in the American imagination. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Daniel Boone's name has been synonymous with the American frontier ever since a highly colored narrative of his exploits appeared in John Filson's Kentucke (1784)—when Boone was still alive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOEL COWARD by Clive Fisher
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 17, 1992

"A mixed bag, then, marred by blind spots—but welcome for its detailed discussion of the plays and on-target enough of the time to be useful, perhaps, as a balance to Lesley's far less critical biography. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Not, of course, contrary to the publisher's blurb, the first ``in-depth biography''—Cole Lesley's 1976 Life of Noel Coward was discreet yet complete—but a decent enough life-and-work: sometimes strong on the plays and films, weak (to put it mildly) on the songs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ISABEL'S NOEL by Jane Yolen
Released: Aug. 20, 1967

"A zany fantasy with a MAD mag cast, equipped to tickle the reader as well as the read-to."
What will happen when a blond witch spirits a letter to Santa and he shows up in the soup? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"And perhaps they won't, as an intriguing Epilogue and coy Author's Note slyly suggest. Long may the Moosepath League flourish."
Reid's expert appropriation of the benign world of Charles Dickens continues in this third volume of his richly entertaining saga (Cordelia Underwood, 1998; Mollie Peer, 1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL WEBSTER by Robert V. Remini
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 6, 1997

"Though Remini's obvious admiration for Webster may sometimes cloud his view, a more complete and engrossing biography could not be produced. (photos, not seen)"
This massive biography leaves no stone unturned in portraying a familiar but little-studied antebellum figure, considered the young country's best orator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANIEL MARTIN by John Fowles
Released: Sept. 12, 1977

"The surprise is that he has chosen to burden his realest, smallest story with the unlikely job of explaining—and finding hope in—Twentieth-Century Life."
A writer and his women ("his past futures, his future pasts")—and an attempt to discover "what had gone wrong not only with Daniel Martin, but his generation, age, century. . . ." Read full book review >