Search Results: "Nora Hilb"


BOOK REVIEW

NORA by Constance C. Greene
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"No wonder Chuck finds Nora's quiet ways likable; as her wry narration demonstrates, she's perfectly capable of nabbing the attention she needs, and entertaining her audience in the process. (Fiction. 10-12)"
If only the heroines of this tale—Nora, almost 13, and sibling Patsy, just 12—didn't seem so much older than their ages suggest, Greene would have a near-perfect tale about the hauntings of the heart. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NORA, NORA by Anne Rivers Siddons
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 18, 2000

"Quirky family drama mixed with a Forrest Gumpish catchall of early '60s pop culture: sure to entertain, if not enlighten."
Coming-of-age tale from Siddons (Low Country, 1998, etc.) set in the South circa 1961. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEO’S TREE by Debora Pearson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"A tried-and-true theme, pleasantly iterated. (Picture book. 3-5)"
In a sort of prequel to The Giving Tree, Leo's father plants a "scratchy, branchy" linden in the yard to mark Leo's birth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT'S A GIFT! by Gabriela Keselman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 13, 2014

"Very little fun and lots of preaching do not make a good story. If the lesson is to give away all your stuff until you have nothing left, what child wants to learn that? (Picture book. 4-7)"
Anthropomorphic animals enact something of a frenzy of giving and receiving. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WIGGLE GIGGLE TICKLE TRAIN by Nora Hilb
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"An enthusiastic salute to the power of imagination. (Picture book. 2-4)"
The imagination of preschoolers gets a boost of realism from photographs in this collaboration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAMA’S WILD CHILD/PAPA’S WILD CHILD by Dianna Hutts Aston
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"Nicely done. (Picture book. 2-6)"
While one among many in the "If I were your . . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE CHICK AND MOMMY CAT by Marta Zafrilla
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"Works equally well at promoting acceptance of differences and as a general read-aloud. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Talk about your nontraditional families… Little Chick was just an egg when Mommy cat, who can't have kittens of her own, adopted him from a hen with too many chicks to feed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLITHER SLIDE, WHAT'S OUTSIDE? by Simon Shapiro
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"Yet another spark for young imaginations. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Similar to Hilb's Wiggle Giggle Tickle Train (with co-author Sharon Jennings and photographer Marcela Cabezas Hilb, 2009), this imaginative romp shows kids using nature to fuel their creative play through all the seasons of the year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOISY NORA by Rosemary Wells
Released: April 30, 1973

"And flew it down the stairs'—and the more reassuring when she is searched for in panic and welcomed back with joy after she finally runs away."
Compared to Jane Breskin Zalben's icky pink siblings in Cecilia's Older Brother (1973), Nora and her family are both more essentially mouselike and more recognizably human. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NORA WEBSTER by Colm Tóibín
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A novel of mourning, healing and awakening; its plainspoken eloquence never succumbs to the sentimentality its heroine would reject."
A subtle, pitch-perfect sonata of a novel in which an Irish widow faces her empty life and, incrementally, fills the hole left by the recent death of her husband. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NORA AND THE TEXAS TERROR by Judy Cox
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 2010

"Fans of Johanna Hurwitz and Beverly Cleary will embrace these two modern cousins. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Third graders Nora and Ellie are cousins, but they struggle to be friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NORA & KETTLE by Lauren Nicole Taylor
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 29, 2016

"A complicated, unlikely friendship with an ending that feels simplified. (Historical fiction. 13-16)"
Teens Nora and Kettle endure hardships while leading two different lives in 1950s America. She lives in a brownstone; he, on the streets. But, at their very cores, they share a common need: survival. Read full book review >