Search Results: "Norman Stone"


BOOK REVIEW

WORLD WAR TWO by Norman Stone
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"Stone's well-known conservatism is on display mostly in his greater praise of America and contempt for the Soviet Union, so readers of all stripes may roll their eyes, but they will find plenty to ponder."
Having written a long, quirky, often astute history of the post-World War era in The Atlantic and Its Enemies (2010), British historian Stone moves back in time to deliver a much shorter, entertaining history of the war itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORLD WAR ONE by Norman Stone
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2009

"A stimulating, easily digested introduction to the cataclysm that inaugurated the 20th century."
The First World War in fewer than 250 pages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2010

"Readers who can tolerate Stone's often-irate editorializing will find a quirky but perceptive history."
A sharp, highly opinionated chronicle of the Cold War. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

NORMAN OHLER
by Claiborne Smith

If someone asked you to guess how many books have been written about Adolf Hitler or Germany’s World War II–era army, you might think, “Do I have to?” And you would be forgiven for reacting that way: even if you don’t know the number of books, you know the tally must be overwhelming (in fact, a cursory search on ...


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BOOK REVIEW

WHAT NIGHT DO ANGELS WANDER? by Phoebe Stone
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Stone weaves a generous spell; it will be hard for children not to smile along with the final, glorious spreads. (Picture book. 4-8)"
How do angels celebrate Christmas Eve? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AT THE END OF WORDS by Miriam Stone
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2003

"This offering stands as a moving tribute to a lovely and loving mother and daughter relationship. (Memoir. YA)"
A sensitive and poetic examination of the author's mother's last days, this spare memoir provides a distinctly literary alternative for fans of traditional teen weepers as well as an inspiration for aspiring writers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAR MARTIN by Nic Stone
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 17, 2017

"Though constrained, the work nevertheless stands apart in a literature that too often finds it hard to look hard truths in the face. Take interest and ask questions. (Fiction. 14-18)"
In this roller-coaster ride of a debut, the author summons the popular legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. to respond to the recent tragic violence befalling unarmed black men and boys. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAPPY ENDINGS by Katherine Stone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"The Jaguar finds a Lexus; no one should have to park alone."
A sob story with a silver lining: Beautiful people suffer and are saved through the transfiguring power of love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JERUSALEM FILE by Joel Stone
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"The line between hunter and hunted, like the line between Arab and Jew, is razor-thin in this spare, pensive but never brooding study of obsessive love."
In this novel by Stone (A Town Called Jericho, 1992), who died in 2007, a retired Israeli intelligence analyst playing detective stalks the adulterous wife of a jealous husband. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ECHELON VENDETTA by David Stone
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 15, 2007

"Fast-moving, smart, sexy and alarming. Everything you want in a thriller."
Hallucinogens, Indians, orchids, butchery, treason, ghosts and politics pop up in Venice, London, Washington, Simi Valley, Butte and the high western desert in a smashing debut thriller by a pseudonymous former military intelligence officer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 1992 by Robert Stone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 12, 1992

"A better-than-usual collection."
Stone, in an agreeably short, scholarly, assured preface, makes note that nine of the twenty choices here come from The New Yorker because "while The New Yorker is still able to attract first-rate submissions, the days are past when there was such a thing as a 'New Yorker story.'" He also notes that his choices "reflect what is probably the most significant development in late-twentieth-century American fiction, the renewal and revitalization of the realist mode....As of 1992, American writers seem ready to accept traditional forms without self-consciousness in dealing with the complexity of the world around them." Read full book review >