Search Results: "Olga Grjasnowa"


BOOK REVIEW

ALL RUSSIANS LOVE BIRCH TREES by Olga Grjasnowa
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"A thoughtful, melancholy study of loss."
A young Azerbaijan-born Jew tries to escape those ethnic and racial modifiers, with limited success, in Grjasnowa's flinty debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"A very attractive volume, and an ideal holiday gift."
Momentos M†gicos/Magic Moments ($11.95 paperback original; Jan. 1998; 188 pp.; 0-87483-497-X): A charming bilingual collection of 15 Latin American folktales retold by a popular Mexican-American performance artist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROSE FANCIER by Olga Masters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1991

"Though not always fleshed out, and several attempts at humor fall flat, the finest pieces here are worthy companions to her earlier reputation-making collections."
Seventeen stories from the late Australian Masters (The Home Girls, A Long Time Dying, etc.), varying in length and quality and ranging from the late 19th century to contemporary times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVING DAUGHTERS by Olga Masters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 1993

"With echoes of The Rainbow and Women in Love, a proto-feminist take on the Australian outback early in the century: a book that Masters's fans will want to have."
The late Australian writer Masters's (The Rose Fancier, 1991, etc.) first novel, only now being published here: a Lawrentian-like opus about two sisters and a smitten reverend after WW I. Though a little rough around the edges, this first fiction powerfully predicts the biting, unforgettable work that was to follow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWELVE HOUSES by Olga Soaje
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 28, 2013

"An engaging novel that authentically portrays a widow's pain and her chance at finding peace."
Soaje (Borrowing My Mother's Saints, 2012) offers a subtle, nuanced novel about how a web of personal connections—old and new—allows a grieving woman to restart her life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAPPY DISHES by Olga Ferreiro
NON-FICTION
Released: May 5, 2016

"Appealing dessert recipes in a labor of love become overshadowed by an unattractive layout."
A longtime, passionate baker offers a collection of sweet treats and a bevy of instructions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DREAM LIFE OF SUKHANOV by Olga Grushin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2006

"Brilliant work from a newcomer who's already an estimable American writer."
A Russian artist's compromise with Soviet bureaucracy provokes a surreal midlife crisis in this first novel by Russian-born Grushin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LONG TIME DYING by Olga Masters
Released: April 3, 1989

Masters (Amy's Children, 1988) didn't start producing fiction until her mid-50s, and died in 1986 after a short, prolific career (five books). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Chronology of federal legislation; glossary; bibliography; list of organizations; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
A factual, objective, and well-organized description of the serious conflicts now arising over water around the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LINE by Olga Grushin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2010

"By no means a negligible book, but something of a disappointment coming from the gifted Grushin."
The line of the title serves as bold metaphor in this earnest successor to The Dream Life of Sukhanov (2006). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORTY ROOMS by Olga Grushin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Honest, tender, and exquisitely crafted. A novel to savor."
The award-winning author of The Dream Life of Sukhanov (2006) and The Line (2010) contemplates the tension between art and domesticity.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRAGON FEATHERS by Andrej Dugin
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

Two Russian painters showcase their superb technical skills with a set of polished scenes in the style of the early Northern Renaissance, featuring static, richly dressed figures, compressed perspectives, tiny floral and architectural details rendered with dazzling clarity, and a host of cryptic symbols, artist's monograms, and amusingly grotesque little creatures—all bathed in creamy golden light. Read full book review >