Search Results: "Olga Masters"


BOOK REVIEW

OLGA by Elise Gravel
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 13, 2018

"A well-wrought sophomore offering with a delightfully unconventional heroine. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 7-11)"
In her second science-based adventure, inquisitive Olga relies on research to help determine what ails her beloved pet, Meh. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROSE FANCIER by Olga Masters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1991

"Though not always fleshed out, and several attempts at humor fall flat, the finest pieces here are worthy companions to her earlier reputation-making collections."
Seventeen stories from the late Australian Masters (The Home Girls, A Long Time Dying, etc.), varying in length and quality and ranging from the late 19th century to contemporary times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LONG TIME DYING by Olga Masters
Released: April 3, 1989

Masters (Amy's Children, 1988) didn't start producing fiction until her mid-50s, and died in 1986 after a short, prolific career (five books). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVING DAUGHTERS by Olga Masters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 1993

"With echoes of The Rainbow and Women in Love, a proto-feminist take on the Australian outback early in the century: a book that Masters's fans will want to have."
The late Australian writer Masters's (The Rose Fancier, 1991, etc.) first novel, only now being published here: a Lawrentian-like opus about two sisters and a smitten reverend after WW I. Though a little rough around the edges, this first fiction powerfully predicts the biting, unforgettable work that was to follow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLGA AND THE SMELLY THING FROM NOWHERE by Elise Gravel
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 14, 2017

"A bubble-gum crowd pleaser with wide audience appeal. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 7-10)"
A young girl who prefers science to people discovers an adorable and smelly little creature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 14, 2014

"Eye-opening and insightful."
A Canadian freelance journalist probes the fascinating mystery behind a nonagenarian female's stunning success as a competitive athlete. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLGA THE CLOUD by Nicoletta Costa
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"A beguiling ode to gentle rain. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A cloud's gotta do what a cloud's gotta do. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 14, 2013

"One of the best paranormal fantasy releases of this year—a self-publishing benchmark."
This extraordinary work of paranormal fantasy—a debut, no less—revolves largely around the morally bankrupt owner of a museum of oddities who attempts to reinvigorate his flagging business by capturing the Hodag, a legendary creature believed to inhabit the woodlands of northern Wisconsin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALLEN MASTERS by John Edward
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 19, 2012

"Edward makes Dan Brown look like Shakespeare. And that's a powerful bit of conjuring indeed."
There's no psychic powerful enough to ferret out where celebrity medium Edward mislaid his writing talent, but it certainly isn't in this flaccid suspense novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Masters' Mysterium by R. R. Reynolds
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 8, 2015

"Like Charlaine Harris' Midnight, Texas saga this is cutting-edge genre fiction that will appeal to genre fans as well as mainstream fiction readers. It's a storytelling tour de force no matter the categorization."
This rousing sequel to Reynolds' debut novel (Masters' Mysterium: Wisconsin Dells, 2013) continues a paranormal fantasy saga chronicling the epic battle between angels and demons and the humans entangled in their war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 29, 1993

"Rich character studies, plus lucid explanations of psychological concepts."
More well-told, insightful narratives from the files of psychotherapist Weinberg (Nearer to the Heart's Desire, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PULP MASTERS by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"The two exceptions are James M. Cain, whose tricky valentine 'The Embezzler' is vintage Cain, and Mickey Spillane, who, despite the absence of Mike Hammer from 'Everybody's Watching Me,' sounds, for better or worse, exactly like Spillane."
The biggest revelation of these five pulp novelettes, 1938-77, and Harry Whittington's 1953 short novel So Dead My Love is how much more their common voices and formulas, often displayed in apprentice work, make then sound like each other than like the eventually famous authors—John D. MacDonald (a fraternity killer), Lawrence Block (a stag-party killer), Donald E. Westlake (a sad, crimeless anti-romance)—you thought you knew. Read full book review >