Search Results: "Olivier Ka"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1998

At once novel, cultural essay, mythology, and collection of linked stories, Italian writer Calasso's newest is a buoyant, expansive narrative that captures, with earthy vigor, scrupulous scholarship, and epic breadth, the Indian cultural ethos. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIER by Philip Ziegler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 10, 2014

"Despite a lack of revelations, this is probably the best Olivier book for general readers."
Veteran biographer Ziegler (Edward Heath, 2010, etc.) offers a well-rounded portrait of the legendary English actor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIER by Terry Coleman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"Writers, like God, dwell in details. Coleman should have remembered that He also makes judgments."
Once more unto the great actor's life, and what a slog it becomes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAURENCE OLIVIER by Donald Spoto
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 11, 1992

"Sure to be read for the gossip, and worth skimming for curious bits of interview material, but—with its flat delivery and spotty documentation—an only so-so addition to the crowded Olivier reference room. (More than 75 halftones—not seen.)"
Despite having conducted dozens of interviews with those who knew Olivier, Spoto (author of biographies of Hitchcock, Tennessee Williams, and others) offers little important new material—and few fresh insights—in this long, uninspired biography. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY GREAT BIG MAMMA by Olivier Ka
by Olivier Ka, illustrated by Luc Melanson, translated by Helen Mixter
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2009

"One quick disparagement of thinness is less than ideal but doesn't spoil Ka's welcome new celebration of being 'perfect just the way you are.' (Picture book. 3-7)"
A soft, cozy portrait of a soft, cozy mamma whose little boy loves her fatness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIG, SCOOP, KA-BOOM! by Joan Holub
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 25, 2013

"An early-reader book to build on. (Early reader. 4-6)"
An accessible, rhyming text drives this story-with-a-twist about a construction site, inviting new readers to hone their emerging skills. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY FATHER LAURENCE OLIVIER by Tarquin Olivier
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Choice all the way and filled with unpublished letters from Larry to Tarquin, Jill, and others that reveal a charming but guilt-ridden Olivier."
Tarquin Olivier's second book, first published in Great Britain, follows his The Eye of the Day (1964—not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PLANE GOES KA-ZOOM! by Jonathan London
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 14, 2010

"A deft weave of word and image. (Picture book. 2-5)"
London's rhymed text is easy to follow, easy to read and, importantly, easy to engage; like the subject, it lifts young readers and carries them off. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARROT AND OLIVIER IN AMERICA by Peter Carey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 23, 2010

"Quirky and erudite, but the payoff in human-interest terms is meager."
A New World historical novel from Carey, the two-time Australian-born winner of the Man Booker prize. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET OF KA by Christopher Pike
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"The soap-opera model has propelled Pike through the literary world, and there's no reason to change now. (Fantasy/thriller. 12 & up)"
Fifteen-year-old Sara Sashee Wilcox developed a major crush on Amesh Demir moments before she tried to take a package from him in the lobby of a Turkish hotel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KARI'S SAGA by Robert Jansson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2008

"An accurate and engrossing tale for history buffs and Viking aficionados."
An ambitious story of interclan feuding in Iceland set against sweeping European events in 1000 CE. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET OF YOUR NAME/KIIMOOCH KA SHINIKASHOOYEN by David Bouchard
CLASSICS
Released: June 1, 2010

"The white text set on mostly earth-brown backgrounds is occasionally difficult to read, but this provides a window on a culture largely unknown in the United States, though its burden will be felt by many whose pasts have disappeared in the Melting Pot. (Poetry. 10 & up)"
A moving poem gives voice to the yearning of a Métis man for the names of his Native ancestors. Read full book review >