Search Results: "Olivier Koenig"


BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIER by Philip Ziegler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 10, 2014

"Despite a lack of revelations, this is probably the best Olivier book for general readers."
Veteran biographer Ziegler (Edward Heath, 2010, etc.) offers a well-rounded portrait of the legendary English actor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVIER by Terry Coleman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"Writers, like God, dwell in details. Coleman should have remembered that He also makes judgments."
Once more unto the great actor's life, and what a slog it becomes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 13, 1992

``Cognitive neuroscience'' is the name of the game, which Harvard psychologist Kosslyn and Univ. of Geneva colleague Koenig equate to ``wet mind.'' The ``wet'' alludes to understanding how the brain really works (equating brain function to mind), and not, as with ``dry mind,'' to designing computers or models of artificial intelligence to perform visual perception or reasoning tasks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAURENCE OLIVIER by Donald Spoto
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 11, 1992

"Sure to be read for the gossip, and worth skimming for curious bits of interview material, but—with its flat delivery and spotty documentation—an only so-so addition to the crowded Olivier reference room. (More than 75 halftones—not seen.)"
Despite having conducted dozens of interviews with those who knew Olivier, Spoto (author of biographies of Hitchcock, Tennessee Williams, and others) offers little important new material—and few fresh insights—in this long, uninspired biography. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY FATHER LAURENCE OLIVIER by Tarquin Olivier
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Choice all the way and filled with unpublished letters from Larry to Tarquin, Jill, and others that reveal a charming but guilt-ridden Olivier."
Tarquin Olivier's second book, first published in Great Britain, follows his The Eye of the Day (1964—not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARROT AND OLIVIER IN AMERICA by Peter Carey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 23, 2010

"Quirky and erudite, but the payoff in human-interest terms is meager."
A New World historical novel from Carey, the two-time Australian-born winner of the Man Booker prize. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANUTA by John Koenig
Released: Jan. 26, 2013

"A fine World War II-era historical novel that breathes life into a long-gone era with its timeless characters and exciting conflicts."
In an inspiring novel of survival, a young Polish girl experiences marriage and motherhood in a time of war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THUMBELINA by Andrea Koenig
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1999

"A nice debut that takes its time getting going, but it does win you over."
Somewhat muted but eventually affecting debut narrated by its 14-year-old protagonist, a pregnant orphan too stubborn to abort her baby or to follow rules laid down by grownups. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELLO LIFE by Andrea Koenig
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2005

"Gwen's inferiority complex sets up a barrier to reader sympathy, in a tale at times delightfully intractable, though by end a hard nut to crack."
Cantankerous narrative of a girl in the logging country of the Pacific Northwest who chooses a tough way to deal with the death of her mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 8, 2007

"German-American equestrians, full charge; all others may safely pass."
Convoluted tale of an American-born doctor who attempted to sabotage the U.S. effort against Germany in World War I. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIDES OF BLOOD by Joseph Koenig
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"An absorbing mystery, incandescent action, and an Iran locked in nightmare: Salman Rushdie would love this novel."
A Gorky Park-style thriller that's truly frightening—because it's set in today's Iran, which in Koenig's expert hands (Smuggler's Notch, 1988, etc.) unfolds as a modern-day Bedlam run by Muslim fanatics. Read full book review >