Search Results: "Orson Welles"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CITIZEN KANE BOOK by Pauline Kael
Released: Oct. 28, 1971

"Miss Kael's piece is, expectably, spankingly entertaining as well as informative and the dual project will have its new-old appeal."
The only name that doesn't belong above is that of Orson Welles', for if Citizen Kane was not only his greatest movie but is still as fresh as the day that it opened, he had nothing to do with "The Shooting Script" which, along with takes from it, and notes by Gary Carey, constitute three quarters of this book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUINS by Orson Scott Card
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 30, 2012

"Nobody combines gee-whiz, geeky speculation and angst-y adolescent navel-gazing better than Card; this series should prove catnip to his many fans. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
In this sprawling science-fiction sequel to Pathfinder (2011), three time-shifters discover that the secrets of the past threaten their world with imminent obliteration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MASTERPIECES by Orson Scott Card
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 6, 2001

"Duh?"
Card (Shadow of the Hegemon, 2000, etc.), science fiction's popular neo-pastoral writer, picks his 27 favorites of the century—most of which are undisputed classics, even if Poul Anderson's "Call Me Joe," Brian Aldiss's "Who Can Replace Man?" and Arthur C. Clarke's "Nine Billion Names of God" have been included in so many best-of and college textbook collections that they are almost canonical. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENDER'S SHADOW by Orson Scott Card
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Card is always at his best, as here, when he's writing about children: an absorbing, near-flawless performance that, while fully intelligible, should send everyone scurrying to reread the original."
Manfully resisting the temptation to rewrite his successful 1985 child-warrior saga, Ender's Game, Card instead offers a parallel yarn, told from the point of view of Ender Wiggin's lieutenant, Bean. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED PROPHET by Orson Scott Card
Released: Feb. 5, 1998

The second installment of Card's Tales of Alvin Maker (Seventh Son, 1987), about an alternate frontier America where folk magic works (people have "knacks"), Red men are still very much in evidence, and numerous colonies exist alongside a fledgling US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALVIN JOURNEYMAN by Orson Scott Card
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Comes close, though."
Fourth in Card's alternate-world series (Prentice Alvin, 1989, etc.) where magic works (people have "knacks") and continental North America is divided among a small United States, English and Dutch colonies, New England, and inviolable Red territory beyond the Mizzipy River. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHADOW PUPPETS by Orson Scott Card
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 19, 2002

"Unfortunately, much of it has the feel of a primer on how to grow up—and Card is much less endearing when he's writing for children rather than about them."
Card's child-warrior saga (Shadow of the Hegemon, 2001, etc.) goes on . . . and on. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLANET CALLED TREASON by Orson Scott Card
Released: July 6, 1979

"A few sunny lines, but basically a mess."
A half-baked parody of fantasy/sci-fi formulas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SONGMASTER by Orson Scott Card
Released: July 7, 1980

"Something like a promising first draft of a nice though syrupy idea."
Mikal the Terrible, pacifier of the galaxy, has learned of the extraordinary singing children ("Songbirds") who are trained in the Songhouse on the planet of Tew and then sent to a few deserving hosts for six-year sojourns before returning to the austere Songhouse as instructors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGIC STREET by Orson Scott Card
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 5, 2010

"An often intriguing story, told with Card's usual impeccable skills—and yet the themes fail to cohere, and this peculiarly off-center fable never quite drags itself out of sheer make-believe and into fictional reality."
Contemporary fantasy (Enchantment, 1999, etc.) set in the close-knit, exclusively black Los Angeles suburb of Baldwin Hills. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TREASON by Orson Scott Card
Released: Nov. 15, 1988

"Still rather hurried, somewhat mushy and juvenile, but a large improvement over the original."
A rewrite and expansion of Card's early novel A Planet Called Treason (1979), about the descendants of gifted exiles struggling to escape the planet on which they have been confined. Read full book review >