Search Results: "Pamela Zagarenski"


BOOK REVIEW

THE WHISPER by Pamela Zagarenski
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Surreal, staggering mixed-media paintings make traveling across such beautifully varied and bizarre storyscapes exhilarating. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A "magical book" on loan from her teacher loses its words on the trip home, so a little girl spins her own stories for each enchanting picture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HENRY & LEO by Pamela Zagarenski
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Invite young readers to talk about this visual feast for the imagination, and something magical may happen. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The bond between a child and a beloved stuffed lion is put to the test. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLEEP LIKE A TIGER by Mary Logue
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 23, 2012

"This deeply satisfying story offers what all children crave when letting go—security and a trusted companion. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The stages and script preceding this child's passage into dreamland are so appealing they will surely inspire imitation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MITES TO MASTODONS by Maxine Kumin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 25, 2006

Kumin, a distinguished poet and winner of the Pulitzer Prize, offers 19 rhyming poems that each focus on one specific creature in this somewhat uneven but beautifully illustrated collection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED SINGS FROM TREETOPS by Joyce Sidman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 16, 2009

"Details in the artwork will invite repeated readings and challenge kids to muse about other color icons. (Picture book/poetry. 5-8)"
Describing seasons by colors is not an original concept, but this whimsical color calendar sparkles with creativity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 9, 2007

"Packed with the intensity of everyday pain and sorrow, kids and adults exchange the words that convey grief, delight, love and acceptance of themselves and others. (Poetry. 8-12)"
Providing a surprisingly effective story arc, this series of poems was inspired by William Carlos Williams's famous poem of the same title regarding a theft of plums. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANOTHER PAMELA by Upton Sinclair
Released: April 24, 1950

"A crazy world seen through untutored eyes."
A slightly buriesquad projection of the Pamela theme to a modern setting- a California ranch estate, presided over by an eccentric multi-millionaire, a lady devoted to good works and radical schemes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEASON OF PONIES by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
Released: March 20, 1964

"Topflight fantasy."
The author establishes a tone of realism in the first scene; Pamela's father again drives away, leaving the ten-year-old alone at Oak Farm with his two neurotic spinster sisters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOT, COLD, SHY, BOLD by Pamela Harris
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"One picture that spans an entire spread—of two girls facing each other—is spoiled because the book's binding falls at a crucial area of the photograph; it shows that their 'how-do-you-do' faces are aimed not at each other, but at the buggy occupant of a jar. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A concept book in photographs that holds nothing new for those familiar with Tana Hoban's or Margaret Miller's work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BELINDA by Pamela Allen
by Pamela Allen, illustrated by Pamela Allen
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Australian; perfect to share with a group. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Bessie milks Belinda every day, while Old Tom grows vegetables; but when Bessie goes to visit her daughter, Old Tom is to do the milking. ``There's a good girl,'' he croons, whereupon Belinda declares her intentions with ``one almighty kick.'' She's faster than he is, and also smart enough to snatch the carrot he offers before escaping. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY CAT MAISIE by Pamela Allen
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1991

"A perfect blend of text and pictures to make an entertaining story. (Picture book. 3-8)"
The big boy next door has a big dog named Lobo, but Andrew has no one to play with. Read full book review >