Search Results: "Pascal Mercier"


BOOK REVIEW

LEA by Pascal Mercier
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2017

"Despite Mercier's (Perlmann's Silence, 2012, etc.) lyricism and occasional emotional acuity, the book's depiction of suffering does little to elaborate its closing observation that 'there is unhappiness of a dimension so great that it is unbearable.'"
Two men from Bern who can no longer trust their hands—one is a recently retired surgeon who can't hold a scalpel without trembling and the other can't hold a steering wheel without contemplating suicide—meet by chance in a cafe in Provence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PERLMANN'S SILENCE by Pascal Mercier
Released: Jan. 1, 2012

"The setup is worthy of a David Lodge or Malcolm Bradbury, but Mercier lacks the humor of either of those English satirists; instead, the novel settles into a kind of slow funk, the literary equivalent of moping, as Perlmann wrestles with what to do next, surprised by his own torpor and reluctance. But for readers of a philosophical bent, appreciative of slowly unfolding, elegant tales, this will be a pleasure."
A slow-moving portrait of grief and dislocation by the author of the fast-moving Night Train to Lisbon (2007). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIGHT TRAIN TO LISBON by Pascal Mercier
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"An intriguing fiction only occasionally diluted by redundancy and by Mercier's overuse of the metaphor of a train journey."
An elegant meditative book teaches a painfully ironic life lesson in German-Swiss author Mercier's searching 2004 novel, a critically acclaimed international bestseller being published in the United States for the first time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE COLOR, PASCAL? by Magali Le Huche
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 5, 2016

"A sweet reminder that friends are nice, but sometimes following your heart is best. (Picture book. 3-6)"
It's spring! Pascal the platypus wants to bring the season into his home by painting his room. But when his friends offer advice and help him out, nothing is straightforward. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An imaginative, enjoyable adventure for sci-fi fans."
A teenage girl becomes an intelligence agent on another planet after her brother goes missing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIVINE CHILD by Pascal Bruckner
Released: Nov. 7, 1994

"One of those too-clever novels where the writer is more intent on strutting his stuff than telling a convincing tale."
A would-be Rabelaisian novel from French writer Bruckner (Evil Angels, 1987), who has an interesting idea—defy death by refusing to be born—but smothers it with gratuitously explicit sex, grotesque physical details, and old-hat intellectualism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IF WISHES WERE HORSES... by Francine Pascal
Released: Jan. 17, 1994

"Hard to believe, even harder to care."
Lopsided, thin, whiny novel about young love in New York City and middle-aged widowhood in the south of France: the second adult offering (Save Johanna!, 1981) from the creator of the Sweet Valley High series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 24, 2009

"A fantastic science-fiction ride for young adults."
A pair of child TV stars lead double lives in this rollicking YA science-fiction adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 2001

"Students of psychology and philosophy will find much value in Boyer's treatise, but it will probably strike most general readers as dry and daunting."
A roundabout consideration of why humans turn to otherworldly thoughts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PINOCCHIO by Kate McMullan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"A sharp, ultimately appealing corrective to Disney's better-known confection. (Fiction. 7-10)"
The classic tale of the wooden boy who wants to become real gets a 21st-century update. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST CHRISTMAS TREE by Stephen Krensky
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 16, 2014

"The pint-sized tree isn't quite dead wood, but it never comes to life as a believable character the reader can care about. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A scraggly, undersized evergreen tree finds a home on Christmas Eve in this sentimental story that turns the unwanted tree into an anthropomorphic main character. Read full book review >