Search Results: "Pat Booth"


BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN ICON by Pat Booth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"But with attractive, versatile Stewart's face seeping through every page, who could miss?"
Roman Ö clef about superhomemaker Martha Stewart, a colossus idolized by millions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARRY ME by Pat Booth
Released: April 10, 1996

"The pages practically flip themselves, but this is strictly for fans only—unless you're in the mood for the print version of what could be a three-part Aaron Spelling mini-series starring Heather Locklear as career-woman Rachel. (Literary Guild alternate selection)"
Less steam and sizzle than Booth aficionados (All For Love, 1993, etc.) have become accustomed to in this relatively tame tale of a man who loves three women—and of the women who bond over him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIAMI by Pat Booth
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"Ka-ching-g-g-g."
Bicoastal (Malibu, Palm Beach, etc.) steam and megabuck specialist Booth returns to Florida to dish up the modeling business and flack for the city of bright T-shirts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NASHVILLE by Pat Booth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2002

"Corn pone."
Silly tale of a girl and her guitar from megaselling Booth (American Icon, 1999, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL FOR LOVE by Pat Booth
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 8, 1993

"The blithe mix of theology, barhopping, and orgasms may be too much even for Booth's fans, a fairly tough lot."
Gushy chronicler of the demimonde Booth, whose Miami (1992) was a steamer about the modeling biz in that steamiest of cities, stays in Florida for a near-pornographic peep at psychiatry and New Age religion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 2000

"Doyle emerges as an honorable pillar of Victorian pride and prejudice, even when he wrote ineptly and let others play him for a fool. (40 b&w photos, not seen)"
A discursive, anecdotal life of the prolific creator of Sherlock Holmes by the equally prolific Booth (The Industry of Souls, 1999, etc.), who seeks here to put the bluff Sir Arthur on the same pedestal as the giants of English literature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK DOG by Stephen Booth
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"You don't even have to supply your own rain."
An eternal cloud seems to have been hanging over the Peak District village of Edendale even before Harry Dickinson reports finding the Reebok trainer of 15-year-old Laura Vernon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE INDUSTRY OF SOULS by Martin Booth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"By turns terrifying and moving, an observant book likely to be long remembered."
Much published in England but known here only for his nonfiction (Opium: A History,1998), Booth offers a gripping tale'short-listed for the Booker—of the gulag and one man's escape from it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KENDRA by Coe Booth
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"The powerful beginning nevertheless signals Booth as a talent to watch. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Kendra, a thoughtful, introspective teen, is more into theatrical design than getting into trouble. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOUL STEALER by Martin Booth
ADVENTURE
Released: June 1, 2005

"The parts may not add up, but some of them are memorable enough to keep reader interest in the series going. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
This sequel to Doctor Illuminatus (2004) is likewise shaky on internal logic, but rich in thoroughly researched alchemical lore and icky set pieces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOCTOR ILLUMINATUS by Martin Booth
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

Booth draws heavily on old alchemical texts, herb lore, and lurid accounts of witchly deeds for this chiller, but neglects to link it all with a coherent story. Read full book review >