Search Results: "Patricia C. McKissack"


BOOK REVIEW

A FRIENDSHIP FOR TODAY by Patricia C. McKissack
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"This simply told story will leave readers pondering our progress—or lack thereof—in race relations over the past 50 years. (Fiction. 9-12)"
The title may lead readers to expect a contemporary tale; instead, McKissack chronicles the events of 1954 and 1955, a tumultuous time in the life of 12-year-old Rosemary Patterson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"637, etc.) has written a stunning and thoroughly researched addition to the Royal Diaries series. (epilogue, historical note, family tree, photos, maps, pronunciation guide, glossary) (Historical fiction. 8-14)"
This remarkable book tells the true story of a courageous young princess who grew to be a military leader and hero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2000

"This part of American history is too often glossed over in textbooks, but must be understood in the context of modern race relations. (Fiction. 11-14)"
In this new addition to the Dear America series, life in 1919 is peaceful and happy for Nellie Lee Love and her family in the little town of Bradford Corners, Tennessee. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Maps and index not seen. (Nonfiction. 11-15)"
Calling on both contemporary travelers' accounts and songs of the griots, the McKissacks reconstruct the history of three West African empires, each of which flourished in turn, only to be nearly buried by time and scholarly prejudice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 1, 1991

"No bibliography, sources, or index. (Biography. 7-9)"
Wells-Barnett (1862-1931) was a journalist whose lifelong fight against discrimination began at age 16. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A comprehensive treasury of memories, verbal art, and play. (notes, bibliography, index) (Folklore. 1-10)"
An ebullient collection of African-American playtime lore, traced to its sources. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 22, 2006

"Capped by blues harmonica player Cake Norris's two-part odyssey up and down the ladder to Heaven, these tales all lend themselves to telling or reading aloud, and carry the common theme that even the worst rascals have saving graces. (author's introduction) (Short stories. 10-12)"
The author of The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural (1992), illustrated by Brian Pinkney, mines a lighter vein with nine original tales that hark back to yarns from her Tennessee childhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE CROCODILES HAVE WINGS by Patricia C. McKissack
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 15, 2005

"As a connecting device, a little boy in plaid pajamas bounces in and out of the illustrations, landing in bed at the final verse that indicates that such fantastical creatures can be found in the pages of favorite books. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Bold and imaginative collage illustrations swirl and swoop against neon-bright backgrounds in this exploration of a nonsensical world "where surprises grow on trees." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"A fascinating and little- exposed area of US history. (glossary, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 12+)"
The powerful, inspirational story of the only African-American contingent of pilots to fly in WW II, nicknamed the Red-Tail Angels for the markings on their aircraft. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Photos and historical reproductions; bibliography; index. (Biography. 9-12)"
Presenting the dramatic life of one of slavery's staunchest opponents, the McKissacks illuminate the most important issues of 19th-century American politics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MILLION FISH...MORE OR LESS by Patricia C. McKissack
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 10, 1992

"In her picture book debut, Schutzer provides freely rendered oil paintings with bold strokes of vibrant color that are especially effective at a distance—fine for groups. (Picture book. 5-10)"
Out fishing on the Bayou Clapateaux, young Hugh Thomas listens with delight when Papa-Daddy and Elder Abbajonto happen by to tell him a tall tale concerning a 500-pound turkey, a Spanish conquistador's lantern that's still burning, and ``the longest, meanest cottonmouth I ever did see.'' After they leave, Hugh Thomas catches just three small fish—and then imagines an even taller tale to tell the men: he catches a million fish, but the crocodiles demand half, and he's able to keep only half of the remainder by winning a jumprope contest with some piratical raccoons on his way home. Read full book review >