Search Results: "Patricia Highsmith"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SELECTED STORIES OF PATRICIA HIGHSMITH by Patricia Highsmith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

This massive tome reprints five of the seven complete collections of short stories by Highsmith (1921-95), together with a brief introduction by Graham Greene excerpted from a sixth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 16, 1980

"No surprises, no tension, and, surprisingly, no depth or conviction in the ambiguous malemale relationship that is usually Highsmith's forte."
The Talented Mr. Ripley was grand. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIPLEY UNDER GROUND by Patricia Highsmith
Released: Sept. 18, 1970

"Sometimes you suspect that Miss Highsmith as well as Ripley is getting away with murder—but they both do it so elegantly."
Ripley is one of Patricia Highsmith's casually unconscionable miscreants; he lives in luxury in the south of France off a charming young wife and off the proceeds (via England) of a fraudulent art enterprise consisting of the canvases of a dead painter (forged). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 20, 1988

"In any case: a moderately welcome volume for devoted Highsmith fans, but with little to interest those who've found her recent work disappointing."
Eleven short stories from the 70's and 80's, featuring—like much of Highsmith's recent fiction—morbid obsessions, suicidal urges, and considerable nastiness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EDITH'S DIARY by Patricia Highsmith
Released: June 1, 1977

"Even as Edith is struggling to cope—whether preparing a festive lunch for imaginary grandchildren or calmly admitting the knowledge that Cliffie had fatally overdosed Uncle George—moral speculations surface about the respective responsibilities of the uncaring and the unloved, tenterhooks cushioned with an enveloping intimacy of character and place."
As in a few of her earlier stylish illuminations of dank acts and clouded minds, Highsmith leaves questions of morality to linger on after it's curtains—as here, for Edith, a Pennsylvania housewife much abused. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIPLEY UNDER WATER by Patricia Highsmith
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 8, 1992

"It's been 12 long years since The Boy Who Followed Ripley: welcome back, Tom."
Tom Ripley, the charming, resourceful swindler/killer who's survived four earlier tales of skullduggery, provides just the antidote for the recent glum misogyny of seminal psychological- suspenser Highsmith's recent work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOUND IN THE STREET by Patricia Highsmith
Released: Oct. 28, 1987

"Sporadically engrossing, then, but largely unsatisfying."
Highsmith (Strangers on a Train), a pioneer of the psychopathology thriller, is to some extent responsible for the high level of craft at work in that genre today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORY-TELLER by Patricia Highsmith
Released: June 15, 1965

"As before, Patricia Highsmith keeps her story teeter-tottering between the intent to kill and the actuality and it is handled with the niggling nastiness she manages so well."
The story-teller is Sydney Bartleby who lives in an old house in rural England with his wife, Alicia; he writes tv scripts; she paints; they quarrel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1988

"Together with the shaky novel Found in the Street and other recent story collections, these crude tales suggest that Highsmith—once such a powerful storyteller—is no longer in full artistic control of her morbidity and misanthropy."
Ten heavy-handed parables, mostly cartoonish and occasionally stomach-turning—aimed at such worthy but obvious contemporary targets as homelessness, pollution, militarism, nuclear power, right-wing religions, and Nancy Reagan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLACK HOUSE by Patricia Highsmith
Released: March 16, 1988

Eleven stories, published some time ago in England, from the darkly gifted, highly uneven Highsmith (Strangers on a Train, Found in the Street), who is rarely at her best in the short-story form. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TREMOR OF FORGERY by Patricia Highsmith
Released: March 21, 1969

"Proceeds as slowly as a tired caravan, but something different in the mystery line."
Through John Ingham, an American novelist, and his fellow tourists in Tunisia, the author investigates the strange disappearance of moral values on the part of this ordinary Western man when he finds himself isolated in the Near East. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS SWEET SICKNESS by Patricia Highsmith
Released: Feb. 3, 1959

"A high level of conviction- from the everyday circumstances to the special symptomology of the case at hand."
Another Rorschach of a psychotic personality is a detailed, not a smudged, record of a schizoid's double vision: as David Kelsey, he leads a spotless life in a furnished room; weekends he spends as William Neumeister with Annabelle whom he loved and who married another man. Read full book review >