Search Results: "Patricia Volk"


BOOK REVIEW

TO MY DEAREST FRIENDS by Patricia Volk
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 18, 2007

"Volk's protagonists always have the same lunch at Bergdorf's, an easy-to-eat chopped salad; she serves up similar light fare."
Chic lit meets shtick lit in—where else?—New York, New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 11, 2001

"And would she ever make them proud in these pages. Emotionally luxurious and heart-gladdening. (22 photos)"
Novelist/essayist Volk (White Light, not reviewed) pens a stylishly written memoir that's really a series of portraits of the memorable characters who make up her extended family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHOCKED by Patricia Volk
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 2013

"Witty, tender and vividly nostalgic."
The spirited account of how an encounter with a memoir by couturier Elsa Schiaparelli (1890-1973) transformed a young girl's view of what it meant to be a woman. Read full book review >

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PATRICIA BOSWORTH
by Gerald Bartell

In a series of successful biographies, Patricia Bosworth trained the spotlight on four major American artists: Montgomery Clift, Marlon Brando, Diane Arbus, and Jane Fonda. Now, in The Men in My Life: A Memoir of Love and Art in 1950s Manhattan, Bosworth takes center stage.

The memoir follows her life and career from the 50s through the early 60s as ...


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BOOK REVIEW

METAPATTERNS by Tyler Volk
NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 1995

"But does it? (photos, not seen, and illustrations) (Book-of-the-Month Club selection)"
A vision of nature through eyes looking for patterns in space and time. Read full book review >

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BEST BOOKS OF 2016: PATRICIA BELL-SCOTT
by Maya Payne Smart

In The Firebrand and the First Lady, scholar Patricia Bell-Scott illuminates the unlikely friendship between two historic American women. Radical civil and women’s rights activist Pauli Murray and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt corresponded for years and swayed one another’s social justice aims and strategies. Their views never converged, but Bell-Scott makes a compelling case that they grew with and toward ...


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BOOK REVIEW

MAYBE IN MISSOULA by Toni Volk
Released: May 20, 1994

"Disappointing."
An ambitious second novel from the author of Montana Women (1991) and winner of a James Michener Fellowship. Read full book review >

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PLAYTIME WITH MCKISSACK
by Julie Danielson

Award-winning author Patricia C. McKissack (born in middle Tennessee, I proudly add) has had a long and distinguished career in the field of children’s literature. Not one to rest on her laurels—I believe she will turn 73 this year—she’s bringing readers this month a superb new book, a volume that I’ve no doubt we’ll judge later as one of the ...


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PATRICIA C. MCKISSACK
by Jessie Grearson

Have you ever wondered who wrote “Amazing Grace” or thought about the haunting story behind the hymn “I’ll Fly Away”? Ever skipped rope to “Hot Pepper” or counted “Eenie, Meenie, Miney, Mo”? Then Let’s Clap, Jump, Sing & Shout; Dance, Spin & Turn it Out!: Games, Songs & Stories from an African American Childhood is for you. Award-winning author Patricia ...


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BOOK REVIEW

CORRUPTION by Tahar Ben Jelloun
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

A brief, intensely focused portrayal of moral and psychological dissolution, by the Prix Goncourtwinning Moroccanborn novelist (With Downcast Eyes, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXTREMELY LOUD by Juliette Volcler
NON-FICTION
Released: June 4, 2013

"Dry but disturbingly illuminating in the possible ramifications."
Everything you ever suspected or feared about music as a weapon, sound as torture and the expansion of the military-industrial complex to encompass entertainment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONTANA WOMEN by Toni Volk
Released: Jan. 23, 1992

"Still, Volk's material has been much worked-through, and there's a kind of quiet distance to her approach: her story stings, but it never really draws blood."
A James Michener Fellowship winner sets her first novel on the prairies of Montana, but its events, which cast large shadows of meaning as the story progresses, could have happened anywhere. Read full book review >