Search Results: "Patrick Dillon"


BOOK REVIEW

LOST AT SEA by Patrick Dillon
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 10, 1998

"Dillon's fine book tells us its the same as it ever was: men at sea equals men at supreme risk. (16 pages photos, not seen) (Author tour; radio satellite tour)"
A taut, heartbreaking story of fishermen who died at sea, the subsequent mare's nest of an investigation, and congressional maneuverings over maritime safety bills, from Pulitzer—winning journalist Dillon (The Last Best Thing, 1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORY OF BUILDINGS by Patrick Dillon
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 11, 2014

"Broad of historical (if not international) scope and with illustrations that richly reward poring over—but unfocused. (index, timeline) (Nonfiction. 12-14)"
Biesty's precisely drawn, finely detailed architectural views supply the highlights for this unfocused survey of homes and prominent buildings through the ages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

From English historian, architect, and novelist Dillon, an admirable history of the London gin craze that tainted everyone involved. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST BEST THING by Patrick Dillon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 21, 1996

"First-novelist Dillon re-creates Silicon Valleyspeak with comic aplomb, which more than compensates for his hobbled plot."
Pulitizer-winning journalist Dillon's breezy debut novel, first serialized in The San Jose Mercury News, takes its lead from business news about the fallout in the computer software industry- -it's full of nasty details about the day-to-day workings of Silicon Valley and that monster of the north, Microsoft. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Includes timelines, lists of monarchs and an index but no source lists. (Nonfiction. 11-13)"
Tricked out with a ribbon, foil highlights on the jacket and portrait galleries at each chapter's head by Ireland's leading illustrator, this handsome package offers British readers an orgy of self-congratulatory historical highlights. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 2, 2010

"A well-reported, densely written saga with a gigantic cast of characters that becomes difficult to track through the ever-shifting narrative."
Two Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists explore the world of a lawyer who became wealthy by representing plaintiffs against multinational corporations committing fraud, but who simultaneously defraded the legal system. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"This is a gift book in the best sense, to be read often; if children don't respond immediately to its overall formality, they will surely find pages to pore over herein. (Picture book. 9+)"
The Dillons illustrate the familiar verses of Ecclesiastes in the King James version, one spread for every double-edged phrase, e.g., "a time to mourn, and a time to dance." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IF KIDS RAN THE WORLD by Diane Dillon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 26, 2014

"Well-meaning but saccharine and didactic. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Leo Dillon's last book with Diane Dillon imagines what the world would be like if children were in charge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOTHER GOOSE: NUMBERS ON THE LOOSE by Leo Dillon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Includes a brief note on the history and selection of the rhymes. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Long-limbed numbers and letters, anthropomorphic insects, stalwart vegetables, inventively dressed animals and other unusual creatures join multiethnic humans in a cheerful march to the irresistible rhythm of Mother Goose in this selection of numerical nursery rhymes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AYRSHIRE MURDERS by E.R. Dillon
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 20, 2014

"Although the Scottish hero and his apothecary sidekick in Dillon's series debut are a mite anachronistic in their pursuit of forensic science, Kyle is an attractive hero trying to do right by both Southrons and Scots."
A deputy sheriff balances patriotic loyalty against sworn duty in late-13th-century Scotland. Read full book review >