Search Results: "Patrick J. Buchanan"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 18, 2011

"Liberals may rightly dismiss this sprawling, often rambling book as nativist claptrap. Readers willing to excuse the nods to predictable right-wing shibboleths and bogeymen will find it a troubling analysis of how America has changed for the worse in the last half century, and how difficult it will be to pull it back from the loss of freedom and prosperity Buchanan sees not far ahead."
Buchanan (Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War": How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World, 2009, etc.) mourns the passing of the America of his youth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 18, 2002

"Shameless, embarrassing rantings. Little attests to the moral health of this nation more than the fact that it's made a mockery of Buchanan's presidential ambitions time and again."
It's the Great White Hope pitted against the godless hordes in Buchanan's (A Republic, Not an Empire, 1999, etc.) stark worldview from the fringe right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 8, 2014

"A mostly evenhanded (from this great distance) consideration of a president from one of his closest advisers."
The populist conservative and senior adviser to Richard Nixon tells how he helped turn the loser into a winner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Vintage Buchanan: provocative, intelligent and not a little strange."
Conservative stalwart Buchanan skewers the Republicans and the rich. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATRICK by Geoffrey Hayes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2011

"For the most part, though, the format, vocabulary and art work well here to encourage kids to read on their own and have fun doing it. (Graphic early reader. 4-6)"
Hayes, the Geisel Award-winning creator of the Benny and Penny stories (Benny and Penny in the Big No-No, 2009, etc.) introduces a new character in this collection of short graphic stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATRICK by Stephen R. Lawhead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 25, 2003

"A straightforward Celtic paperback yarn, but this one is blessedly short on the talking trees, magic swords, and warrior maidens that clutter up so many from Lawhead (Mystic Rose, 2001, etc.). Still, you'll still need to be a serious Celt-ophile to get through it."
A fictionalized biography of St. Patrick, circa a.d. 400, concentrating on the "lost years" of the famous Irish patriarch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATRICK by Tomie dePaola
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 15, 1992

"An excellent contribution. (Biography/Picture book. 4-8)"
A brief, straightforward summary of the known facts about the saint's life, illustrated in dePaola's usual accomplished manner with simple, stylized figures and a pleasing variety of frames bordered with gold bands that unify the whole. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 17, 1999

"Hopefully readers will look past the warts and approach the central argument with the gravity it deserves."
A theoretically coherent analysis but an unnecessarily flawed prescription. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

J by Howard Jacobson
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A pleasure, as reading Jacobson always is—though much different from what we've come to expect, which is not at all a bad thing."
Jacobson (The Finkler Question, 2010, etc.), Britain's answer to Philip Roth, returns with an enigmatic tale of the near future.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUCHANAN DYING  by John Updike
Released: April 1, 1974

"Il est plus aise de connaitre l'homme en general, que de connaitre un homme en particulier' — might serve as a fitting clue to the fundamental absence of emotional interest, since the most revealing, intimate touch about Buchanan's character in Updike's dry, cold, statuesque play comes in an early stage direction: 'This is the so-called Back Bedroom, preferred by the dying man perhaps because, being over the kitchen, it was warm."
John Updike has made a stalwart attempt to rescue James Buchanan from historical oblivion — and failed. Read full book review >