Search Results: "Patrick McCabe"


BOOK REVIEW

PATRICK by Geoffrey Hayes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2011

"For the most part, though, the format, vocabulary and art work well here to encourage kids to read on their own and have fun doing it. (Graphic early reader. 4-6)"
Hayes, the Geisel Award-winning creator of the Benny and Penny stories (Benny and Penny in the Big No-No, 2009, etc.) introduces a new character in this collection of short graphic stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATRICK by Stephen R. Lawhead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 25, 2003

"A straightforward Celtic paperback yarn, but this one is blessedly short on the talking trees, magic swords, and warrior maidens that clutter up so many from Lawhead (Mystic Rose, 2001, etc.). Still, you'll still need to be a serious Celt-ophile to get through it."
A fictionalized biography of St. Patrick, circa a.d. 400, concentrating on the "lost years" of the famous Irish patriarch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATRICK by Tomie dePaola
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 15, 1992

"An excellent contribution. (Biography/Picture book. 4-8)"
A brief, straightforward summary of the known facts about the saint's life, illustrated in dePaola's usual accomplished manner with simple, stylized figures and a pleasing variety of frames bordered with gold bands that unify the whole. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CALL ME THE BREEZE by Patrick McCabe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2003

"By turns fascinating, repulsive, heartbreaking, and unreadable: probably the greatest mess McCabe has published to date."
McCabe (Emerald Germs of Ireland, 2001, etc.) slips a bit deeper into the Slough of Despond with his latest account of madness, squalor, violence, perversity, and hope in the north of Ireland. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOLY CITY by Patrick McCabe
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"The author's weakest work to date, a waste of his considerable talent."
Disappointing ninth novel from McCabe (Winterwood, 2007, etc.), the self-portrait of an Irishman undone by childhood trauma. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEAD SCHOOL by Patrick McCabe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 26, 1995

"McCabe is the man."
McCabe, as skilled and significant a novelist as Ireland has produced in decades, follows up 1993's acclaimed The Butcher Boy- -his third novel and American debut—with yet another savagely acerbic riff on the decay of modern life and the modern Irish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMERALD GERMS OF IRELAND by Patrick McCabe
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 2001

"One wonders, though, why McCabe seems compelled to keep retelling the same essential story, with minimal (albeit artful and ghoulishly amusing) variations. One gets the point, appreciates the skill with which it's made, and wishes this impressively gifted author would move on."
The violent history that continues to plague the Irish writer's fragmented homeland, dramatized in such critically praised fiction as The Butcher Boy (1993) and Breakfast on Pluto (1998), once again suffuses his blackly comic—and frustratingly arch—latest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BREAKFAST ON PLUTO by Patrick McCabe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"A good yarn, but nowhere near The Butcher Boy (1993): McCabe's terrorist demimonde is at once too bizarre to be moving and too familiar to be fresh."
An account of modern Ireland and her Troubles from the perspective of a small-town transvestite, by one of this year's Booker Prize—finalists (Carn, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STRAY SOD COUNTRY by Patrick McCabe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"Hopefully the change of venue will liberate this talented author."
The Irish McCabe uses elements familiar from his previous work for his latest novel, a ghoulish small-town burlesque. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINTERWOOD by Patrick McCabe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"Unremittingly bleak—provokes a reaction but ultimately feels hollow."
McCabe, never afraid to explore the grimmest parts of small-town Ireland, tugs the reader into an especially troubling portion of it in this novel about violation and madness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONDO DESPERADO by Patrick McCabe
Released: March 1, 2000

"A disappointment: McCabe's voice is a treasure, but it cannot turn water into beer."
A collection of vaguely linked stories, set in the fictional Irish town of Barntrosna and putatively authored by one Phildy Hackball - who is, in fact, none other than Irish novelist McCabe (Breakfast on Pluto, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >