Search Results: "Patrick McGrath"


BOOK REVIEW

PORT MUNGO by Patrick McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2004

"Dark brooding over dusty secrets in what's far from McGrath's best."
The life of a painter haunted by the death of his daughter, as related by his admiring sister: McGrath's latest is more contemplative than such turbulent tales as Asylum (1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASYLUM by Patrick McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"McGrath, always a worthy descendant of Poe, here takes things a level higher—producing fiction in the tradition of Henry James. (First printing of 75,000; author tour)"
A contemporary master of highbrow gothic fiction, McGrath (Dr. Haggard's Disease, 1993, etc.) sticks to worldly psychopathology in his icy new novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONSTANCE by Patrick McGrath
Released: April 2, 2013

"A novel of fierce rages and great tenderness, exhausting in its emotional intensity."
Unhappy families being unhappy in their own way...again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARTHA PEAKE by Patrick McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 2000

Best known for such vivid and thoughtful literary thrillers as Spider (1990) and Asylum (1997), McGrath extends his range with this ambitious historical melodrama, a tale both as seductively fascinating and as ungainly as its boldly imagined antihero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRAUMA by Patrick McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 11, 2008

"Unpleasantly self-righteous characters gather accusingly around a narrator who's awfully clueless for a shrink—though well written and shrewdly perceptive, as always, this isn't one of McGrath's more compelling efforts."
A psychiatrist with a major Mom problem grapples with guilt and rage in this latest exploration of gothic family ties from McGrath (Port Mungo, 2004, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DR. HAGGARD'S DISEASE by Patrick McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1993

"An unbearably memorable ending lifts this to classic level while the thin bright nerves of the storyline are padded with magnificent surgical detail, hospital lore, and moods you can rub your finger down."
McGrath carries on his winning streak in the short horror novel form (Spider, 1990; The Grotesque, 1989; Blood and Water and Other Tales, 1987). Dr. Haggard's disease is sexual passion, and the story of its ravages is told in flashback as the crippled hero pieces it out to the heroine's son James, an RAF pilot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 1991

"Should do well, though."
Cadillac Gothic with new chrome stripping on stories going to the same old grave, by some heavy-hitters in the rich-prose department. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOST TOWN by Patrick McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 6, 2005

"Strange bedfellows, but good company."
A vision of New York as a battleground, both literal and figurative, links three spirited stories from a master of sophisticated melodrama (Port Mungo, 2004, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN FEELING BAD IS GOOD by Ellen McGrath
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 2, 1992

"McGrath breaks no new ground here, but she plows old fields with a sure hand, without stodginess or flippancy. (Drawings.)"
According to clinical psychologist McGrath (former chairperson of the American Psychological Association's National Task Force on Women and Depression), it's perfectly normal to feel depressed if you're a woman—in fact, if you're not angry or feeling victimized by the cultural pain of being female, you're living ``in a fantasy world of denial.'' Here—in a handbook packed with quizzes, diagrams, lists, charts, and exercises, and dramatized by pseudonymous anecdotes from her practice—McGrath spells out with great clarity how to recognize these bad feelings and use them positively. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 2004

"Not all preaching to the choir, though—comparative-religion types at least should take a look."
Tremble, ye doubters: God isn't dead. He's back—and He's brought friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 5, 2007

"'The relocation was an ill-conceived solution that was inhuman in its design and its effects,' the Canadian government admitted half-a-century after the fact. McGrath's careful study provides ample evidence."
No good deed goes unpunished. So discover the Inuit band that brought Nanook of the North to the silver screen. Read full book review >