Search Results: "Paul Auster"


BOOK REVIEW

PAUL by A.N. Wilson
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

In a worthy companion volume to his Jesus: A Life (1992), novelist-biographer Wilson (A Watch in the Night, 1996, etc.) adeptly recreates the milieu of Christianity's greatest interpreter and missionary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAUL by Jerome Murphy-O'Connor
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1996

"Acts, though historically imprecise, makes for a much better story."
A dry historical tome that would be more aptly titled ``Paul: A Cultural History.'' The difficulties of doing ancient biography are compounded when one of the two major sources available is believed to be historically unreliable and corrupt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Paul by Gesner Noel
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 5, 2016

"An excellent single-volume introduction to Christianity's first theologian."
A brief but thorough account of St. Paul's life and an analysis of its significance in the subsequent development of Christianity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"With this novel, Auster reminds us that not just life, but also narrative is always conditional, that it only appears inevitable after the fact."
Four versions of an ordinary life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUNSET PARK by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"Sure to please Auster fans and likely to attract new readers as well."
With a plot that encompasses war in the Middle East, economic recession and the perils of the publishing industry, a contemporary vitality distinguishes the latest from the veteran author. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAND TO MOUTH by Paul Auster
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Required, inspiring reading for Auster-holics and aspiring writers."
Artistic failure, financial woes, and broken love are the subjects of Auster's wide-ranging philosophical memoir, a candid assessment of the demands and rewards of art, work, and money. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. VERTIGO by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Disappointing."
Auster (Leviathan, 1992, etc.) departs from his usual cerebral fiction for this quick trip into Doctorow Land — a mytho-historical tale that invokes the American '20s, complete with glamorous gangsters and legendary sports stars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 4, 1992

"Auster's 'eccentric and peculiar tastes' cohere, in these critical pieces, into something much more than his modest claim that he's 'simply one writer trying to talk about others."
Thirty Auster essays, reviews, prefaces, and interviews, nearly all of which have been previously published in small literary magazines or The New York Review of Books. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEVIATHAN by Paul Auster
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"In a world thrown off-balance by uncertainty and chance, he pursues facts with the determination of a hard-nosed detective."
With each new work, Auster (Moon Palace, The Music of Chance, etc.) is quickly becoming our preeminent novelist of ideas—a postmodern fabulator who grounds his odd and challenging fictions in conventional and accessible narrative structures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 20, 1987

"Then, however, murky psycho-philosophical dynamics—Camus manque—take over, much as they did in Ghosts. (The apparently autobiographical narrator says of the trilogy: 'These three stories are finally the same story, but each one represents a different stage in my awareness of what it is about.')"
The first two volumes of Auster's "New York Trilogy"—City of Glass (1985) and Ghosts (1986)—used mystery-fiction formulas as the basis for avant-garde explorations of identity crisis, death wish, and other existential traumas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE COUNTRY OF LAST THINGS by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1986

"A stunning achievement."
Auster here turns from the metafictional playfulness of his recent detective yarns (City of Glass, 1985, and Ghosts, p. 822), and offers a spare and chilling account of a civilization in decay It's a post-apocalyptic vision of urban holocaust that bears witness to past, present, and future devastations. Read full book review >