Search Results: "Paul Galdone"


BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE WISHES by Paul Galdone
Released: Oct. 15, 1961

"Facial expressions are his forte and he uses them to the hilt in this simple retelling."
Another tried and true folk tale illustrated in the comic manner of Galdone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE RED HEN by Paul Galdone
Released: Aug. 1, 1973

"The industrious hen provides the action, and it's all played out in a minutely realized dilapidated old farmhouse and a sunny yard that fairly leaps with wheat and weeds and flowers."
Everymother has her day, and the freeloading cat, dog and mouse their comeuppance, in fresh, expressive pictures that do full justice to the enduring tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 4, 1974

"Round the wonderful bean."
A brisk, rhymed "Jack and the Beanstalk" first published in England in 1807 and set off here with bright, broadly comic (and, in the case of the looming giant, broadly grisly) pictures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AMAZING PIG by Paul Galdone
Released: March 1, 1981

"Never mind that Galdone's pictures have become predictable—they still give his stories more life and simple fun than many more ambitious illustrators can summon."
Once more a king announces a contest for his daughter's hand; once more a poor peasant sets out to win it; and once more Galdone disarms with his down-to-earth egalitarian humor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE TUPPEN by Paul Galdone
Released: Feb. 23, 1967

A simple, sturdy Scandinavian cumulative tale on the pattern of The Old Woman and Her Pig; a smallish, squarish format Just the shape of mother hen sitting; appropriately expressive but not exaggerated illustrations: a pleasant package for the littlest listeners. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HORSE, THE FOX AND THE LION by Paul Galdone
Released: Feb. 28, 1968

"You don't, of course, need the book otherwise."
A little-known, decidedly lesser Grimm story ("The Fox and the Horse") is the basis for an amusing set of pictures as the old horse, turned out by the ungrateful farmer, is assisted by the fox in capturing the lion, thereby assuring himself of the farmer's protection for the rest of his life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KING OF THE CATS by Paul Galdone
Released: April 1, 1980

"Instead of using a folk tale as occasion for display, Galdone applies himself to the spirit of the story—with results that should transfix a kindergarten audience."
With his well-known facility for expressive if unsubtle accompaniment, Galdone plays up the spooky humor of this tale from Jacobs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE BILLY GOATS GRUFF by Paul Galdone
Released: Feb. 22, 1973

"But even the goats (until that idyllic conclusion) have a wildly insistent look about them, and those who find Brown's troll too scary will be grossed out by this one's large blue nose (especially when seen from below), yellow teeth, bulging eyes, and hair of floating rainbow colored scribbles."
Galdone's troll is every bit as gruesome as any we've seen, but without any of the awesomeness that Marcia Brown or the D'Aulaires suggest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GINGERBREAD BOY by Paul Galdone
Released: Feb. 1, 1975

"We must admit that his ogling threshers and mowers have less individual appeal than the typically Galdone-y loping cow, stuffed looking horse and ever-so-self-satisfied fox, but children will follow along breathlessly with every one of them right up to that last snip snap snip when the Gingerbread Boy goes ''the way of every single gingerbread boy that ever came out of an oven."
Galdone has already proven many times over that he is perfectly at home with those traditional nursery tales that are still preschoolers' favorites, and his expressive, unassuming style just right for their very young audience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGIC PORRIDGE POT by Paul Galdone
Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"Ah well, some like it obvious."
The story of the magic porridge pot gone out of control is an old favorite (and one of ours) and Galdone gives it an amusing twist by having the mother forget the magic words (frantically shouting "halt!" and "cease!" instead of "stop!" as the porridge flows down the village streets) and the little girl come to the rescue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 8, 1963

"If you don't like what Saxe did with the original — welcome to the club."
The illustrator has set his pictures against the John Godfrey Saxe version of the famous Indian legend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MONSTER AND THE TAILOR by Paul Galdone
Released: Sept. 1, 1982

"But for the single child, listening or looking, it's a crudely executed artifice."
In intent, another "Scary Story"—following The Tailypo and King of the Cats; in actuality, a lame excuse for a story framing a central scare sequence. Read full book review >