Search Results: "Paul Galdone"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 26, 1969

"Presumably why it alone endured."
Jack Sprat could eat no fat,/ His wife could eat no lean,/ And so between them both,/ They licked the platter clean has always had a ring of finality but the blurb claims—and Mr. Galdone evidently believes— that children inquire "And then what happened?" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HENNY PENNY by Paul Galdone
illustrated by Paul Galdone
Released: Oct. 1, 1968

"Artful artlessness, that catches the tempo and amusement of an old favorite, that doesn't smother it With special effects."
Led by the misled Henny Penny, five mettlesome fowl march across sunny pages, follow sideling Foxy Loxy into his cave and disappear forever in deep green gloom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE SILLIES by Paul Galdone
Released: Sept. 1, 1981

"In this mock-Victorian interpretation, the conclusion comes off particularly well—'So the young man went home and married his own dear silly'—and the two hearts set below, one grinning, one demure, reinforce the feeling that what we have is not so much a dimwit tale as a valentine."
A genial rendering of the classic Joseph Jacobs' tale—with less suggestion of witlessness and less pictorial ingenuity, perhaps, than the Margot Zemach version (now o.p.), but probably more popular appeal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 8, 1969

"And some of it is worth seeing."
The Jataka tale of the monkey who twice outwits the predatory crocodile, first by pretending that he keeps his tastiest part, his heart, in a tree, then by persuading him to be a talking rock (and so reveal his whereabouts), is amusing enough but no better as a picture book until you reach his last laugh: feigning a jump into the crocodile's wide-open mouth — and knowing that the crocodile will have to close his eyes — he pounces on the crocodile's head, springs across to the fiver bank and gets home free to his tree. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT by Paul Galdone
Released: March 15, 1961

"From the malt, 3 huge bags- full, to the farmer gaily sowing corn, children will delight as the poem spins and joins and then unravels back to 'the house that Jack built'."
Paul Galdone's humorous and animated illustrations in three colors effectively bring back to life another of these well loved Mother Goose rhymes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG by Paul Galdone
Released: Feb. 10, 1960

"With humor and logic, the somewhat sadistic element of the story becomes less forbidding."
The classic story of the old woman and her pig is told here with the pictures by Paul Galdone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 8, 1963

"If you don't like what Saxe did with the original — welcome to the club."
The illustrator has set his pictures against the John Godfrey Saxe version of the famous Indian legend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 19, 1982

"But there's nothing fresh about any of it, just a competent professional performance."
Galdone borrows from folklore for this little tale of Fox and the progressively lip-smacking contents of his sack. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PADDY THE PENGUIN by Paul Galdone
Released: Aug. 17, 1959

"Paul Galdone whose animal stories and drawings have won him a considerable reputation catches the humor of the penguin without sacrificing accuracy in his treatment of the aquatic bird."
A very wistful penguin looks longingly at the Arctic sky, wishing that — since he has wings, he could fly like a proper bird. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUMPELSTILTSKIN by Paul Galdone
Released: March 18, 1985

"Certainly these pictures will project to storyhour crowds, but they are all blare and no echo."
A Galdone-illustrated folktale can be counted on for visual thrust and expression, but in recent years those Galdone trademarks have become perfunctory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 20, 1970

"No one will want to abandon Leslie Brooke but like Galdone's Henny Penny, this animates the tale for the widest possible audience."
Three little pigs to savor, and a wolf to lord it over: from the clover-sprigged jacket (three-leaf of course) to the third little pig covering the steaming pot from which the wolf's tail protrudes, this is a blithe, unbloody business with a leer on the face of the wolf that you can only laugh at. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A  STRANGE SERVANT by Blanche Ross
translated by Blanche Ross, illustrated by Paul Galdone
Released: Oct. 3, 1977

"With the merchants outbidding each other for possession of the marvelous rabbit, and the peasant successfully blaming its new owner for the animal's unreliability, it's a good joke in any language—though Galdone's pictures, accessible as ever, haven't the variety Or (surprisingly) the story-telling thrust that any tale requires."
A rabbit is pawned off as an obedient messenger by a poor peasant who thereby outwits three rich merchants. Read full book review >