Search Results: "Paul Henry Johnson"


BOOK REVIEW

SCROLLS OF DARKNESS by Paul Henry Johnson
Released: Aug. 8, 2012

"A slow-paced thriller that ultimately delivers."
Brent Michaels must prevent the devil from unleashing hell on Earth in this thriller by Johnson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Second Coming by Paul Henry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 16, 2016

"Critical of much in the modern world and hardly subtle, this post-apocalyptic tale offers plenty of fury and angst."
A moralistic debut novel focuses on disparate characters caught in a bleak landscape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHURCHILL by Paul Johnson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 3, 2009

"Personal reflections meet large-scale history, most satisfyingly."
A slender volume on that most unslender of subjects, Winston Churchill. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOZART by Paul Johnson
Released: Nov. 18, 2013

"A hard-sell hagiography but also a compact and knowledgeable portrait of genius."
An impassioned mash note to an immeasurable artist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NAPOLEON by Paul Johnson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2002

"Despite an evident distaste for his subject, Johnson's sharp-edged view of Napoleon is well supported, and well worth considering."
The glory of France and the erstwhile Whig hero comes up short in this biography by a historian of decidedly Tory bent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RENAISSANCE by Paul Johnson
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 25, 2000

"Respectful but not overawed, a look at the Renaissance that will energize general readers to revisit and re-evaluate Renaissance art and architecture."
If it's Thursday, this must be Michelangelo—a stimulating and sophisticated, if rapid, tour of the Italian Renaissance (with the emphasis on the visual arts in the 15th and 16th centuries). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1983

"Cankerous."
The British author of Enemies of Society (1977), a diatribe against Freudianism and Marxism, has cast his likes and dislikes in a historical narrative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 5, 1991

"Maddeningly long and highly opinionated, but a lively and readable history of a world 'exhilarated and sometimes bewildered by the rapid changes which were transforming it."
A gargantuan panorama of the 15 transforming years immediately after the Napoleonic era, when "peace came and immense new resources in finance, management, science and technology which were now available could be put to constructive purposes." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 27, 2007

"The author's vast stores of scholarship and reading keep this jaunty trek from becoming corny."
In a companion volume to Creators: From Chaucer and Durer to Picasso and Disney (2006), prolific English historian Johnson offers a highly idiosyncratic selection of his favorite extraordinary mortals, male and female. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH I by Paul Johnson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 3, 1974

"Totally involving biography, perhaps even touched with relevance for our own era of crisis in world leadership."
This in-depth portrait of English history's consummate stateswoman — her "Justice, temper, magnanimity, judgment" (the queen's own assessment of what best fitted a monarch) — focuses on politics rather than the cult of personality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 19, 1972

"But despite this firm back-of-the-hand to national stereotypes, Johnson has a great affection for the slow moving, genial islanders and their unique capacity to muddle through."
A graceful and effortless perusal of 1500 years of English history, social habits, law and politics by the former editor of the New Statesman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EISENHOWER by Paul Johnson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 4, 2014

"A 120-page monograph cannot replace a complete biography, the best being Jean Edward Smith's Eisenhower in War and Peace (2012). Though Johnson's well-known right-wing views deliver an occasional jolt, this book remains a thoroughly entertaining introduction."
When he left office in 1961, historians considered Dwight Eisenhower (1890-1969) a second-rate president. His reputation's steady rise is not interrupted by this admiring, opinionated account by veteran British journalist and historian Johnson (Mozart, 2013, etc.).
Read full book review >