Search Results: "Paul J. Zak"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2012

"Explaining his use of cutting-edge research to undercut Gordon Gekko's infamous mantra ('Greed is good'), Zak is engaging, entertaining and profound."
Zak (Economic Psychology and Management/Claremont Graduate Univ.; Moral Markets: the Critical Role of Values in the Economy, 2008, etc.) explores a surprising link among neuroscience, morality and economic success. Read full book review >

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PAUL AUSTER
by J.W. Bonner

We live our lives mostly in the moment, but also attendant to the question of what if?— what if we had lived in that town rather than the one I know? what if my father (or mother) had died? what if my parents had divorced? what if I had attended school X rather than school Y? what if I ...


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PAMELA PAUL
by Claiborne Smith

Readers who know Pamela Paul’s books before she became the editor of the New York Times Book Review know that they are serious works of nonfiction: The Starter Marriage and the Future of Matrimony (2002), Pornified: How Pornography Is Damaging Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our Families (2005), and Parenting, Inc.: How the Billion-Dollar Baby Business Has Changed the Way ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 12, 2016

"A scrupulously reported, gracefully told, exquisitely paced debut."
Centering on a single episode, a powerful declaration of conscience,a Washington Post reporter tells an intensely unsettling story about living with our nuclear arsenal. Read full book review >

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WHERE SHERLOCK HOLMES MEETS FANTASY
by John DeNardo

If Benjamin Franklin were alive today, he'd say that nothing in the world is certain except death, taxes, and Sherlock Holmes stories. Sherlock Holmes, the iconic consulting detective created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887, is a perennial mainstay in the literary world. What's not to like? Holmes' methods of investigation and deductions are flawless and the ...


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BOOK REVIEW

ANCIENTS OF DAYS by Paul J. McAuley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 6, 1999

"Once again, rich, challenging, and inventive, with a satisfying complexity: another extraordinary installment."
More or less independently intelligible sequel to Child of the River (1998). Read full book review >

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7 FANTASY BOOKS HEADING TO FILM AND TV
by John DeNardo

As readers, the idea of our favorite books being turned into film and television production frightens us and excites us. It's scary because so many things can go wrong that could result in – gasp! – an unfaithful adaptation. Yet that doesn't stop us from being excited because we get to re-experience the stories we love. Here are ...


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DAVID GARROW
by Gregory McNamee

Barack Obama has been portrayed as being many things over his life and political career. Some have thought him flippant, coasting by on charm and glibness. Others have thought him suspect. Admirers and detractors both have found him aloof, though very few have doubted the fact of his formidable intelligence.

And admirers and detractors alike have also found Barack Obama ...


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BOOK REVIEW

Corporate Prisoner by J. Paul Kingston
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 11, 2016

"Dramatic testimony and useful guidance about the art and anguish of career management."
A former bank vice president shares his corporate travails, his transition to self-employment, and general business advice in this debut memoir and self-help guide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PASQUALE'S ANGEL by Paul J. McAuley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1995

"Minutely observed, with a fascinating mÇlange of historical and imaginary characters—yet for all its hard work: dismal, forbidding, and tough to get involved with."
The science-fiction subgenre of Victorian ``steampunk'' is well-established—but what might McAuley's latest mind-boggling venture (Red Dust, 1994, etc.), which places the Industrial Revolution back in Renaissance Italy, be called? Read full book review >