Search Results: "Paul Mirocha"


BOOK REVIEW

HOW DO BIRDS FIND THEIR WAY? by Roma Gans
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"A solid introduction to a fascinating topic and a welcome addition to the series. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-9)"
This entry in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out series asks plenty of questions in a brief, lucid text, urging readers to think about what happens to birds in winter—how they return to their nesting grounds year after year across continents and oceans, and how they navigate by day, at night, and in fog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMAZING ARMADILLOS by Jennifer Guess McKerley
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 25, 2009

"A good nonfiction choice for animal lovers testing the reading waters. (Informational early reader. 5-8)"
This Step 3 title in the Step into Reading series explores the little-known insect-eating-and-digging machine that is the armadillo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEE TREE by Stephen Buchmann
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2007

In Malaysia, the yearly wild-honey hunts take place on moonless nights when the bees can't see the men who climb the tualang, the tall bee trees. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PAUL AUSTER
by J.W. Bonner

We live our lives mostly in the moment, but also attendant to the question of what if?— what if we had lived in that town rather than the one I know? what if my father (or mother) had died? what if my parents had divorced? what if I had attended school X rather than school Y? what if I ...


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BLOG POST

PAMELA PAUL
by Claiborne Smith

Readers who know Pamela Paul’s books before she became the editor of the New York Times Book Review know that they are serious works of nonfiction: The Starter Marriage and the Future of Matrimony (2002), Pornified: How Pornography Is Damaging Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our Families (2005), and Parenting, Inc.: How the Billion-Dollar Baby Business Has Changed the Way ...


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BLOG POST

WHERE SHERLOCK HOLMES MEETS FANTASY
by John DeNardo

If Benjamin Franklin were alive today, he'd say that nothing in the world is certain except death, taxes, and Sherlock Holmes stories. Sherlock Holmes, the iconic consulting detective created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887, is a perennial mainstay in the literary world. What's not to like? Holmes' methods of investigation and deductions are flawless and the ...


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BOOK REVIEW

A SURPRISE FOR GIRAFFE AND ELEPHANT by Paul Gude
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 17, 2015

"Readers can't help but feel lifted after spending time with these two companions. (Picture book. 3-5)"
The welcome return of odd-couple pals Elephant and Giraffe (When Elephant Met Giraffe, 2014).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELLO WORLD! by Paul Beavis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A calmly surreal invitation to explore. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Mrs. Mo's Monster (2014), he of the snaggly teeth, spiky blue fur, and lolling pink tongue, is still in the attic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED PANDA'S CANDY APPLES by Ruth Paul
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2014

"The message appears to be the treats are best when shared, which makes Red Panda's attempt at entrepreneurship all the odder. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Who can resist candy apples? Not Red Panda. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN ELEPHANT MET GIRAFFE by Paul Gude
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 17, 2014

"A humorous picture book about two new, unlikely pals. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Loquacious Elephant meets her match in taciturn Giraffe in this debut picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAUL THURLBY'S WILDLIFE by Paul Thurlby
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 12, 2013

"Wordplay, visual jokes and strong design combine to create another winner for Thurlby—and readers. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Fans of Thurlby's recent distinguished entry on the crowded alphabet-book shelves (Paul Thurlby's Alphabet, 2011) won't be disappointed by this clever follow-up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CROW by Alison Paul
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 3, 2007

"Younger and more timorous audiences will appreciate the take-it-or-leave-it quality of the suspense. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Riffing on "The Raven" for her debut, Paul demonstrates that she's no Poe (yet, at least) when it comes to verse—but her shadowy, skewed-perspective paper-collage illustrations do create a properly brooding atmosphere. Read full book review >