Search Results: "Paul Stephenson"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 17, 2010

"Not necessarily for general readers, but the author provides valuable insight into Constantine's era."
Scholar Stephenson (History/Univ. of Durham; Byzantium's Balkan Frontier: A Political Study of the Northern Balkans, 900-1204, 2000, etc.) offers a stately though academic biography of the first Roman emperor who converted to Christianity, with a heavy emphasis on the archaeological record. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PACIFIC DEPTHS by Gary Paul Stephenson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 11, 2014

"Charles isn't terribly charismatic, but his integrity and seemingly endless resources make for a great read."
A billionaire's attempts to make profound changes to counter global problems such as climate change are met with severe resistance from the U.S. president in Stephenson's debut thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRAVEMOUTH by Pamela Stephenson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"More fan fodder, enlivened by Billy's witty observations."
Further incisive revelations distinguish actress-turned-psychologist Stephenson's follow-up to her perceptive biography of husband Connolly (Billy, 2002), a noted Scottish comedian and actor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONFUSION by Neal Stephenson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 13, 2004

"Packed with more derring-do than a dozen pirate films and with smarter, sparklier dialogue than a handful of Pulitzer winners, this is run-and-gun adventure fiction of the most literate kind."
Stephenson's Baroque Cycle grows streamlined in a hefty but propulsive second volume. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRYPTONOMICON by Neal Stephenson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 4, 1999

Stephenson's prodigious new yarn (after The Diamond Age, 1995, etc.) whirls from WWII cryptography and top-secret bullion shipments to a present-day quest by computer whizzes to build a data haven amid corporate shark-infested waters, by way of multiple present-tense narratives overlaid with creeping paranoia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Plenty of comic twists and crude details (nose picking, drool, cat sticking out its tongue) overflow the pages, making a droll romp out of many a young boy's fantasies. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Sir Charlie Stinky Socks and his "faithful, fearless cat, Envelope," set off for a really BIG adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ICELING by Sasha Stephenson
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Dec. 13, 2016

"Faced with the inconsistent plotting, indifference to geography and climate, and sloppy execution, readers are more likely to abandon this series opener halfway than to wait for Volume 2. (Science fiction. 12-16)"
Discovered by scientists in the Canadian Arctic and later adopted, a group of speechless but intense and powerful teens compel their older siblings to return them to that site a decade and a half later. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"A decent textbook for students of international development in a war zone; those interested in Iraq, foreign policy or compelling narrative nonfiction should look elsewhere."
An on-the-ground account of the botched reconstruction of Iraq. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 1993

"Stephenson intelligently pieces together autopsy and police reports, newspaper accounts, and court testimony to tell his grisly and creepy, but irresistible, story. (Thirty b&w photographs—not seen)"
Using what he calls ``novelistic strategies,'' Milwaukee Sentinel reporter Stephenson vividly recounts events surrounding the July 4, 1987, murder of five members of the bizarre Kunz family of northern Wisconsin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOME REMARKS by Neal Stephenson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 7, 2012

"A occasionally uneven but mostly engaging assortment from a talented literary mind."
The author of The Baroque Cycle series and works of speculative fiction offers a miscellany of stories and essays, some of classic Stephensonian length. Read full book review >