Search Results: "Paula Volsky"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GATES OF TWILIGHT by Paula Volsky
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1996

Another otherworld fantasy from the author of The Wolf of Winter (1993), etc. The teeming, rather backward folk of subtropical Aveshq are dominated, politically and economically, by the brisk, progressive Vonahrish—the obvious model being the British occupation of India. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GRAND ELLIPSE by Paula Volsky
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 10, 2000

"Brimming with action, repartee, intrigue, comedy, magic, and irony, with impressively well-rounded characters and a dash of feminism: a spine-tingling, heartwarming delight."
Volsky's new Victorian fantasy takes place in the same world as The White Tribunal (1997) but otherwise is unconnected. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WHITE TRIBUNAL by Paula Volsky
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 11, 1997

"Skimpy backdrop, thin plot, and characters by the numbers, not to mention the dreadfully feeble conclusion: some graphic tortures but otherwise unpersuasive."
In Volsky's new fantasy (The Gates of Twilight, 1996, etc.), the city of Lis Folaze in Upper Hetzia is slowly recovering from the Sortilegious Wars (though we never find out what these involved). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ILLUSION by Paula Volsky
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 15, 1992

"Surprisingly absorbing and agreeable, given the stereotyped characters and general air of predictability, with unobtrusive yet well thought-out magical notions and a backdrop of genuine depth and consistency."
Give the Russian Revolution a French ambiance, add a dollop of American spirit and a dash of magic—and you have some idea of the setting for this bulky but entertaining historical fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOLF OF WINTER by Paula Volsky
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 15, 1993

"Thoughtful, distinctive, unconventional, and shapely."
Intriguing other-world fantasy from the author of Illusion (1991), set in the subarctic Russian-flavored land of Rhazaulle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOON JUMP by Paula Brown
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Jersey,'' they shouldn't all look like Guernseys)—but the idea is unusual, and the brightly colored, nicely designed illustrations have a merry verve. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Bearing a pole and a pack, Miss Heiferton arrives in time to draw then tenth and last turn for the moon-jumping contest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHADOWS by Paula Weston
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"Generic and grisly. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
Mysterious Rafa arrives, putting everything and everyone 18-year-old Gaby knows at risk. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REAL JANE AUSTEN by Paula Byrne
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 29, 2013

"Her exquisite novels remain the major source of fascination with Jane Austen."
For Austen obsessives, this latest study offers a few flashes of revelation amid long stretches of minutiae. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POLIO, THE A-BOMB AND ME by Paula Viale
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 7, 2016

"A surprisingly uplifting and moving depiction of courage in the face of a physically challenging childhood."
A survivor of a polio outbreak in California transports readers back to a time before the Salk vaccine rid the country of the scourge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HEMINGWAY BOOK CLUB OF KOSOVO by Paula Huntley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2003

"Powerful and bleak: Huntley doesn't see much but bones for the Kosovars to be gnawing on in the near future."
Diary detailing a charged and watchful year living in Kosovo directly after the Serbs' retreat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"A disquieting reminder of the old maxim, 'The dead can't answer back.'"
An attempt to explain a friend's baffling suicide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NINE MONTHS by Paula Bomer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 21, 2012

"Sonia is hard to care about, so her arguments pro and con baby-raising carry less weight than they should."
A Brooklyn woman flips out when she discovers she's pregnant with her third child in this first novel by Bomer, whose previous short story collection (Baby and Other Stories, 2010) took a steely-eyed, unromantic view of motherhood. Read full book review >