Search Results: "Pauline Chandler"


BOOK REVIEW

PAULINE by Georg Hallensleben
Released: Oct. 5, 1999

"The spreads are presented from a weasel's-eye-view are particularly captivating and reinforce Pauline's small stature and mighty impact. (Picture book. 3-6.)"
Pauline (32 pp.; $16.00; Oct. 5; 0-374-35758-7) The illustrator of Kate Banks's many books (The Bird, the Monkey, and the Snake in the Jungle, p. 62, etc,) goes solo for a tale that proves children's suspicion that bigger isn't always better. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"Intriguing. (historical note) (Historical fiction. 11-15)"
Fascination with Joan of Arc has continued for over 500 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAULINE KAEL by Brian Kellow
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 31, 2011

"Like Kael's own books, this bio is a page-turner."
The first biography of arguably the most influential and controversial film critic at a turning point in cinema history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAYMOND CHANDLER by Tom Hiney
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1997

"Hiney ends up nibbling around the edges of Chandler's life and work, as if he'd bitten off more than he could chew. (illustrations, not seen)"
A disappointing new biography of the nonpareil hardboiled writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAULINE BONAPARTE by Flora Fraser
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 27, 2009

"Pauline's blandishments grow quickly tedious, but Fraser does a lively job of delineating the story of her audacious clan."
Napoleon's younger sister—beautiful but not particularly compelling—receives effusive treatment from English biographer Fraser (Princesses: The Six Daughters of George III, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1971

Joan Kahn ably presents this new collection which includes Chandler's introduction to his Simple Art of Murder, four long short stories — "Red Wind," "Trouble is My Business," "Blackmailers Don't Shoot," and "The Pencil," and two novels — The Little Sister and The Long Goodbye which did not appear in the 1964 Knopf Omnibus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1964

Chandler, who with Hammett, not only shaped and sharpened the modern mystery form, but left his own unmistakable insignia- a rasping authenticity- on each book, will be introduced to some readers for the first time, while older devotees will welcome this omnium gatherum of four of his finest: The Big Sleep (1939); Farewell, My Lovely (1940) The High Window (1942) and The Lady in the Lake (1943). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CODE NAME PAULINE by Pearl Witherington Cornioley
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 1, 2013

"A gripping, true story of a courageous secret agent fighting behind enemy lines, as riveting as any work of historical fiction. (photographs, source notes, bibliography) (Memoir. 12-18)"
One of the most celebrated female World War II resistance fighters shares her remarkable, heroic story in this revealing chronicle of her experiences as a special agent for the British Special Operations Executive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2001

"A literary crime committed against one of the greatest writers of the last century."
A collection of letters, poetry, and essays by the master of detective fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MARQUISE and PAULINE by George Sand
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 1999

"Sand is an important enough figure to merit posthumous publication and translation, but little here will interest anyone not already very interested in her."
Two novellas by the celebrated 19th-century French novelist, translated into English for the first time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORLD OF RAYMOND CHANDLER by Barry Day
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 14, 2014

"Chandler wrote not about crime or detection, as George V. Higgins observed, but about the corruption of the human spirit. Day deepens our understanding of how Chandler, who cared for his legacy, balanced commitment to principle with living and prospering in the real world."
Day (The Letters of Noel Coward, 2007, etc.) lets peerless mystery writer Raymond Chandler reveal himself through his own words—and in those of his fictional creation Philip Marlowe—while contributing structure, comment and a useful amount of connective tissue.Read full book review >