Search Results: "Pete Hautman"


BOOK REVIEW

EDEN WEST by Pete Hautman
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 28, 2015

"Ultimately, this is no more than a surface-level exploration of nontraditional religious faith. (Fiction. 14-18)"
Jacob's faith and commitment to his cult's restrictive lifestyle waver when he meets two outsider teens who introduce ideas from the outside world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INVISIBLE by Pete Hautman
FICTION
Released: June 1, 2005

"The deceptively simple prose doesn't keep secrets from its readers, but Dougie's harrowing mysteries are no less tragic for their visibility. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Dougie Hanson is invisible to nearly everyone in this haunting, lonely tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CYDONIAN PYRAMID by Pete Hautman
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 14, 2013

"Hautman continues to write mind-expanding adventures and nail-biting suspense to probe big questions of faith, destiny and personal responsibility. The next book can't come soon enough. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
Middle books in trilogies are tricky, but this taut science-fiction thriller pulls it off with panache. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BIG CRUNCH by Pete Hautman
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"A poignant and quiet tale in which the only special effect is love—refreshing. (author's note) (Fiction. 13 & up)"
Wes Andrews has just ended a suffocating relationship with Izzy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL-IN by Pete Hautman
FICTION
Released: June 5, 2007

"Character progression takes a backseat to the details of poker and the quest to win, but the tournament's tension is top-notch. (Fiction. YA)"
When Denn first came to Vegas, he was a 16-year-old poker player with $100,000. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO STEAL A CAR by Pete Hautman
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"A sharply observed, subversive coming-of-age tale. (Fiction. 13 & up)"
Hautman channels the cynically smart voice of a teenage sometime car thief in this sly cross between Blake Nelson's The New Rules of High School (2003) and Peter Cameron's Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You (2007). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLINKWATER FACTOR by Pete Hautman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Fast, funny episodes featuring creative takes on close-to-reality science. (Science fiction. 8-14)"
Hautman's latest features wacky adventures in a near-future small town packed with engineers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL-IN by Pete Hautman
FICTION
Released: June 5, 2007

"Character progression takes a backseat to the details of poker and the quest to win, but the tournament's tension is top-notch. (Fiction. YA)"
When Denn first came to Vegas, he was a 16-year-old poker player with $100,000. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GODLESS by Pete Hautman
FICTION
Released: June 1, 2004

"Thought-provoking and unique. (Fiction. YA)"
Agnostic-going-on-atheist Jason's mother is a hypochondriac, his father is religious, and best friend Shin is a snail-collecting freak. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWEETBLOOD by Pete Hautman
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: June 1, 2003

"Despite a cast of characters straight out of a formulaic problem novel, an original and powerful tale. (Fiction. YA)"
A gripping, painful, and well-written coming-of-ager with a twist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STONE COLD by Pete Hautman
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Readers will understand too well how empty his triumph is. (Fiction. 12-15)"
A teenager discovers an unexpected talent and runs with it in this perceptive cautionary tale from Hautman (Mr. Was, 1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KLAATU TERMINUS by Pete Hautman
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 8, 2014

"Stories aren't required to provide answers to the big questions they raise about faith, choice, identity and responsibility, but these deserve better than to be dismissed with an uncaring shrug. (Science fiction. 12-18)"
A dazzlingly imaginative science-fiction trilogy, spanning the rise and fall of religions, civilizations and the human race itself, deflates into an oddly pedestrian conclusion. Read full book review >