Search Results: "Pete Sanders"


BOOK REVIEW

DEATH AND DYING by Pete Sanders
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1991

In the ``Let's Talk About'' series, an ineffective attempt to answer the questions young children ask about death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BULLYING by Pete Sanders
by Pete Sanders, illustrated by Mike Lacey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Clearly the book is intended for use with groups, although individual readers may find it helpful, especially the list of associations relating to such issues as safety and child abuse. (index) (Nonfiction. 8-11)"
Part of the What Do You Know About series that addresses social issues, this introduction to a topic all too common to childhood is welcome, although its combination of a fictional story and nonlinear nonfiction makes it tricky to follow at times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOOD AUTUMN by William Sanders
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 12, 1995

"Roper's third case features nicely depressive Oklahoma scenery, though the Native Americans are a bit too monotonously militant and the ending packs one twist too many."
Rita Ninekiller's Cherokee cousin Chris Badwater, who's been jailed for killing Sizemore County (Oklahoma) Sheriff Rowland Jordan, says he's innocent, even though the murder weapon was his own tomahawk. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TANGENT FACTOR by Lawrence Sanders
Released: April 17, 1978

"But macho-zombie Tangent and his gross confederate, Sam Leiberman, set the tone for a vulgar and sluggish tourist trap that manages to make deepest West Africa look and sound like a corner in New York's garment district."
Even the most undiscriminating patrons of Sanders' fiction factory will find this sequel to The Tangent Objective (in which mercenary oil-man Peter Tangent helped Napoleonic Obiri Anokye to depose King Prempeh of Asante) shamelessly conveyor-belted and totally resistible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

McNALLY'S DILEMMA by Lawrence Sanders
Released: July 5, 1999

"If Lardo doesn't win any new friends for the franchise, he won't disappoint old hands either."
You'd have to be a sharper-eyed sleuth than foppish Archy McNally to find Vincent Lardo's name in tiny print on the copyright page, but Lardo, not the late Sanders, is the author of Archy's eighth adventure (McNally's Trial, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PASSION OF MOLLY T. by Lawrence Sanders
Released: Sept. 17, 1984

"But, though limply idiotic as suspense and uncommonly vile as an attempt at misogynistic titillation, this is sure to sell fairly well—like Peter S.—thanks to the Sanders byline and the below-the-belt, lowest-common-denominator approach."
Sanders, never the most tasteful of potboiler-makers, continues his descent into sheer dumb vulgarity—following The Seduction of Peter S. with a neanderthal political/sexual thriller about the feminist threat of the future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 27, 1994

"A few pearls among the paranoia, but this flawed paean to literacy is as awkward as its title."
An academic's meandering foray into the realms of the preliterate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN BLOOD by Ben Sanders
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 17, 2015

"Great dialogue and a hero who won't stay hidden make this a winner for crime fans."
A fast-moving thriller that leaves a trail of blood and grit across the pages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TIMOTHY FILES by Lawrence Sanders
Released: June 15, 1987

"Grossly synthetic and thoroughly unappealing: only for Sanders' most undiscriminating fans."
Three limp, unconnected episodes featuring Timothy Cone, "the Wall Street dick"—in an unusually sloppy, thoroughly hackneyed offering from an uneven, crass mass-producer (The Eighth Commandment, The Fourth Deadly Sin, The Passion of Molly T., etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUR REVOLUTION by Bernie Sanders
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"There's not much what-if here and certainly no indecision. Instead, as if rallying the troops, Sanders writes confidently of a program that's sure to be revisited in 2020."
A dark horse speaks, advancing, after the fact, "an agenda for a new America." Read full book review >