Search Results: "Peter Crane"


BOOK REVIEW

PETER by Kate Walker
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"David, a wiser head, comfortable with his preference, one who can offer physical affection without sexual overtones; and, in Peter, a realistically distressed teenager who is finally able to muster enough perspective to weather his crisis. (Fiction. YA)"
When he finds himself attracted to his older brother's gay friend David, Peter is plunged into the kind of sexual uncertainty many young men feel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEPHEN CRANE by Paul Sorrentino
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2014

"Sorrentino's authoritative and sympathetic portrait revives a 'bohemian rebel' and prolific, groundbreaking writer."
Thoroughly researched biography of Stephen Crane (1871-1900), who shocked his contemporaries with raw, gritty fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRANE BOY by Diana Cohn
by Diana Cohn, illustrated by Youme
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Gracefully celebrates both a little-known culture and its beloved birds. (Informational picture book. 6-9)"
The black-necked cranes that return to Kinga's village in Bhutan each winter inspire the schoolboy to convince his classmates and the local monks to create a festival in their honor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHITE CRANE by Sandy Fussell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2010

"Given these flaws, it is doubtful that most kids will stay with the book long enough to become engaged with story or characters. (Adventure. 11-14)"
Set in an alternative feudal-ish Japan, this is the story of five kids with severe disabilities or disfigurements who have been accepted for training in a school for samurai. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRANE POND by Richard Francis
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A finely crafted consideration of responsibility within a familiar historical tale."
A judge who presided at the Salem witch trials comes to repent of his role. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FERGUS CRANE by Paul Stewart
ADVENTURE
Released: May 23, 2006

"Missable. (Fantasy. 10-12)"
The creators of the Edge Chronicles open a new series aimed at a younger audience with this tale of a lad who discovers that his teachers are all pirates. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEACE CRANE by Sheila Hamanaka
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"They may question Hamanaka's statement that Sadako folded a thousand paper cranes; as the story goes, Sadako died before she was done, and other childrenin tributecompleted her work. (Picture book. 8+)"
The African-American narrator of this apostrophic verse has heard the story of Sadako's thousand paper cranes; the crane, traditional Japanese symbol of longevity, represents her hopes for peace, both in her violent urban milieu and the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEPHEN CRANE by Mark Sufrin
BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 30, 1992

"Bibliography; b&w photos and index not seen. (Biography. 12+)"
An intelligent, beautifully written portrait of ``the first great pyro-technician of the novel, [who] probably wrote more trash than any other serious novelist of his time'' (Alfred Kazin): a strait-laced Methodist minister's rebellious son, who died in 1900, at 28, after a remarkably eventful life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GINKGO by Peter Crane
NON-FICTION
Released: March 19, 2013

"An entertaining introduction to botanical lore."
Crane (School of Forestry and Environmental Studies/Yale Univ.) shares his fascination with the ginkgo tree. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CRANE WIFE by Odds Bodkin
adapted by Odds Bodkin, illustrated by Gennady Spirin
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"An exquisite and memorable volume. (Picture book/folklore. 5-10)"
This rendition of the bittersweet Japanese tale about the lonely sail-maker Osamu, who finds and then loses his perfect mate, is a poetic gem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CRANE WIFE by Patrick Ness
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 27, 2014

"A magical realist meditation on how to love and be possessed by love."
Award-winning YA author Ness (More than This, 2013, etc.) moves to literary fiction with a tale that unfolds after an arrow-pierced crane lands in a London garden. Read full book review >