Search Results: "Peter Cunningham"


BOOK REVIEW

TAPES OF THE RIVER DELTA by Peter Cunningham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1996

"Though undeniable voyeuristic interest is created in the revelation of Shortcourse family secrets, the political aspect feels tacked on to support a narrative that tends toward the tedious and rambling."
The knotted history of a modern Irish family is embedded in a quasi-political debut thriller, a combination providing less than stellar results. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONSEQUENCES OF THE HEART by Peter Cunningham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 4, 2011

"A lovingly detailed examination of 20th-century Anglo-Irish culture as well as a dissection of personal relationships."
In a narrative that spans more than 60 years in the lives of its characters, Irish author Cunningham examines a Jules-and-Jim-type love affair as well as a mysterious incident from D-Day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OAF by Julia Cunningham
Kirkus Star
by Julia Cunningham, illustrated by Peter Sas
Released: Feb. 12, 1986

"It is Oaf who decides, and his decision helps them to discover the treasure: each other."
Using simple, evocative language Cunningham spins another delicate fable of the triumph of good over evil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CROW'S JOURNEY by David Cunningham
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Wonderful for its own sake, Cunningham's work will also enrich a study of the water cycle. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4+)"
The creator of the exquisite Nightfall, Country Lake (1995) has produced another poetic set of observations of the natural world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIGHTFALL, COUNTRY LAKE by David Cunningham
Released: March 1, 1995

"Cunningham's first solo effort is an unqualified success—this masterful production is a reminder that now and then, less really is more. (Picture book. 2+)"
In 24 carefully chosen words and 14 eloquently modulated pastel illustrations, readers follow a small boy from that moment on a late summer afternoon when the breeze dies, through ruddy sunset and misty twilight, until he falls asleep to the sound of crickets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"The illustrations are compelling throughout, but the narrative is more powerful when it is more personal and specific."
An illustrated primer on mental illness that builds to personal revelation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JEFFERSON VS. HAMILTON by Jr. Cunningham
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 14, 2000

"As this useful volume of powerful prose ably illustrates, what often survives a political collision is moral clarity. (10 illustrations)"
Selections from the writings of two of the foremost antagonists among the Founding Fathers, edited and explained by historian and biographer Cunningham (In Pursuit of Reason, 1987). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GEOGRAPHY by Sophie Cunningham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2005

"A bodice-ripper debut with a lesbian twist, too self-conscious to be erotic."
An Australian woman traveling in India tells a new friend the story of her seven-year sexual obsession with an older man living across the world in Los Angeles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLESH AND BLOOD by Michael Cunningham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1995

"Stock characters and equally stock situations do little to help a breathless tale that, despite its gay sympathies, is just an old-fashioned melodrama in contemporary drag. (First printing of 75,000; Author tour)"
Cunningham (At Home at the End of the World, 1990) adds a gay spin to the dysfunctional family genre with a novel that typically blames Mom and Dad, especially Dad, for everything that goes wrong. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TREASURE IS THE ROSE by Julia Cunningham
Released: Oct. 15, 1973

"Cunningham's heavy romanticism is a little easier to take than the drippy sentimentality of her recent Tallow stories, but as usual her talent for simulating a trance exceeds her sensibility, so that from the opening disclaimer that 'To tell about Ariane is to try to grow a rose on paper without the touch of sun and moon, rain and snow that make it real and growing,' she comes as dose to parody as she does to sharing a vision."
In a crumbling 11th century castle hedged with roses, the power of a young widow's gentleness tames a trio of thugs and repels a haughty baron. Read full book review >