Search Results: "Peter E. Meltzer"


BOOK REVIEW

SO YOU THINK YOU KNOW BASEBALL? by Peter E. Meltzer
NON-FICTION
Released: June 10, 2013

"Baseball fans care deeply about tradition, records and history. This book will help them grasp why the rules are so central to the game's past, present and future."
A lively, enlightening trip through the baseball rule book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOODY BONSAI by Peter E. Abresch
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 1998

"A bonus in this winsome, if guileless, debut is a short course in how to style a bonsai plant and use it as a murder weapon."
Unable to generate enthusiasm for anything since his wife's death, retired physical therapist James P. Dandy has let his children cajole him into attending an Elderhostel at the Jersey shore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 14, 2004

"More cautionary even than Apsley Cherry-Garrard's The Worst Journey of the World or Jon Krakauer's Into Thin Air."
A mind-bending yet somberly reflective chronicle of mountaineer Hillary's otherworldly journey with two mates tracing Scott's route to the South Pole. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANTE'S DISCIPLES by Peter Crowther
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1996

"Topflight horror from one proud band of storytellers."
First-rate horror anthology, its 26 tales sparked by Dante's Inferno. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOMBS by Edward E.  Kramer
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1995

"Enjoyable."
A thematic anthology consisting of 21 original tales, a poem, and an utterly deranged introduction from Forrest J. Ackerman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. BOHM AND THE HERRING by Peter Cohen
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 30, 1992

"An offbeat tale, worth trying with children who also like to wonder. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Mr. Bohm, whimsically depicted as an oddly shaped little man with vacant spectacles and an anxious brow, likes to ponder childlike questions: Why does the dog choose that tree? Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Best as a starting point in looking for help and as a summary of the standard medical position on these mental illnesses."
A concise but dry outline of the current standards of medical care for mental illness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOUGH TIMES by Milton Meltzer
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 15, 2007

"Though character development is secondary to the history presented, the fast-paced plot and the history brought to life will make this a memorable story for its audience. (Fiction. 10+)"
In the 1932 Bonus March, 20,000 World War I veterans converged on Washington, D.C., demanding the cash bonus Congress had promised back in 1924. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"An extensive bibliography, photo credits, and index increase its usefulness for student reports. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
In his usual meticulous fashion, Meltzer (Piracy and Plunder, below, etc.) explores the many facets of detective work, from the historical perspective to the contemporary sleuthing of the detective on the street and the laboratory scientist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AMAZING POTATO by Milton Meltzer
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Aug. 30, 1992

Meltzer's long subtitle—"A Story in Which the Incas, Conquistadors, Marie Antoinette, Thomas Jefferson, Wars, Famines, Immigrants, and French Fries All Play a Part"—suggests the range of his latest fascinating exploration of social history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAN FRANCISCO BEAT by David Meltzer
NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 2001

"Just now, as we begin to slip into a national slumber somewhat akin to that of the Eisenhower years, it's exhilarating to have this squall line of Beats pass through our consciousness."
The recusant Beats, like a whiff of cayenne, have a way of gaining your attention, and here they direct their monkey-wrenching, fortifying voices (in 13-part disharmony) at the microphone of poet Meltzer's tape recorder, conveying a whole lot of history and a bracing handful of ideas and opinions. Read full book review >