Search Results: "Peter F. Sale"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Sale provides much food for thought in this provocative look at a hotly debated subject."
A marine biologist warns that at "our ecological bank account is in overdraft." Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


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BLOG POST

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE: FORERUNNER TO AMERICAN HORROR
by Andrew Liptak

It’s almost a rite of passage in high school: your English teacher takes out Nathaniel Hawthorne’s classic American novel The Scarlet Letter, and you, as a student, have to slog through the antiquated prose and story for several weeks. Friends and family don’t remember the book fondly, but recently, I’ve begun to understand just how critical The Scarlet Letter and ...


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BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 29, 1981

"But even the narrowest of the pieces on management- and work-related issues—corporate boards, retirement, public-service programs—have something eye-opening to say."
Diverse essays, 1972-80, looking as usual chiefly to the future—a natural outlook for the nation's top business-management advisor and goad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 20, 2011

"A fascinating look at some of the underlying issues behind numbers—negative numbers in particular—though perhaps more as a curiosity than for practical application."
Erickson delves into the nature of numbers, what they are, how we have formulated them throughout history, where we've gone wrong and how we can fix it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEN, IDEAS, AND POLITICS by Peter F. Drucker
Released: July 28, 1971

"Drucker, a business school professor, has written several books, including The Concept of the Corporation (1964) and Technology, Management and Society (1970)."
Though it offers gleanings for students of economic theory and business, on balance this assortment of essays lacks weight as well as integration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GLENN GOULD by Peter F. Ostwald
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1997

One of Gould's friends memorializes the virtuoso pianist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 5, 1985

"In brief, then, a provocative prescriptive guide that takes the measure of the responsibilities of both management and society in a fast-changing marketplace."
At a guess, Drucker's latest contribution to management literature will command appreciably less than half the attention being lavished on A Passion for Excellence (422). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 16, 1976

"Discussion of the subject is timely and though the book is filled with polemic, it may be the spark that ignites debate."
According to Peter Drucker, the last quarter century has witnessed an unrecorded economic gyration toward nothing short of a unique and salutary American brand of socialism—the ultimate ownership of the nation's business by the nation's workers, as beneficiaries of pension trusts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 6, 1970

"Neatly argued, with points enumerated, expanded, illustrated, and tucked away, this is an accessible sampling of Drucker's insights on technological trends, their management, and their social implications."
Drucker has assembled twelve essays from his substantial backlog of conference papers and magazine articles of the past dozen years to convey the shape and substance of his thought on "how Man works." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHORT CUT TO SANTA FE by Medora Sale
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 2, 1994

"Suspense, romance, and compelling characters carry a chilling, charming, and very well-written tale of adventure."
According to plan, photographer Harriet Jeffries meets her lover, Toronto's police inspector John Sanders (Murder in Focus, 1989, etc.), at Santa Fe's tiny airport for the start of a vacation together. Read full book review >