Search Results: "Peter Godwin"


BOOK REVIEW

MUKIWA by Peter Godwin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1996

"A remarkable national and personal saga that, even in the darkest of its many dark moments, remains sensitive, insightful, and humane."
The insanity of war, the beauty and mystery of Africa, the chaotic death pangs of colonialism, an extraordinary coming-of-age: All swirl hauntingly together in this compelling account of the end of Rhodesia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FEAR by Peter Godwin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2011

"The author's return to his beloved homeland transformed by violence and no longer familiar proves heart-wrenching and extremely moving."
Godwin (When a Crocodile Eats the Sun: A Memoir of Africa, 2007, etc.), a white Zimbabwean journalist schooled in and relocated to England, bears brave witness to the last brutal days of Robert Mugabe's dictatorship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN A CROCODILE EATS THE SUN by Peter Godwin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 17, 2007

"A haunting story."
Zimbabwe's disintegration in the hands of ruthless dictator Robert Mugabe, recounted in careful, beautifully crafted prose by a journalist born and raised there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNFINISHED DESIRES by Gail Godwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 29, 2009

"A strong story populated by a host of memorable characters—smart, satisfying fiction, one of the author's best in years."
After a couple of subpar efforts, Godwin (Queen of the Underworld, 2006, etc.) is back in top form with a gripping tale of jealousies and power struggles at a Catholic girls' school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRIEF COTTAGE by Gail Godwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 6, 2017

"Godwin approaches many of her usual melancholic themes from a different angle and raises the question of whether we get what we want or we get what we need."
Spirits of all types haunt characters in Godwin's latest examination of grief and loss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIOLET CLAY by Gail Godwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 1978

"Godwin's quick, amusingly sharp-tongued narrative assigns the feminist slant to a rich undertone rather than an overlay, making this a bright, but not uncompassionate scoring of the corrosive, self-pitying dramas we block out for ourselves when we live our lives as bad fiction."
Flashbacks at the ready, artist Violet Clay—thirtyish, jobless, broke, drinking heavily in her Manhattan digs—broods over life and Art as she sketches her latest freelance assignment in Gothic book jackets: "over two hundred women running away from houses." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Though not really much more than a commonplace book of the author's personal fascinations, many readers will dip into this appealing grab-bag with pleasure and sometimes surprise."
Bestselling novelist Godwin (Evensong, 1999, etc.) stitches an intimate sampler of the ways we humans have imagined acts of the heart through time and across cultures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOTHER AND TWO DAUGHTERS by Gail Godwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 1981

"With rich, full portraits, seamless philosophic musings, and loamy village humor—a major novel from a talented writer really hitting her stride."
Broadening and deepening the speculations on personal destiny and societal straitjackets touched upon in Violet Clay (1978), Godwin now offers her best work yet: a striking triptych of three contemporary women-in-transit—whose lives "continue to bounce off one another, adding new evidence. . . ." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TOWER OF BEOWULF by Parke Godwin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"Succeeds neither as historical reconstruction nor as heroic fantasy: a tame, uncompelling, sadly mediocre enterprise."
Following an unorthodox reworking of the Robin Hood legend (Robin and the King, 1993, etc.), the versatile Godwin attempts to novelize the famous Old English poem, Beowulf, with its sixth- century setting in Denmark and southern Sweden. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GLASS PEOPLE by Gail Godwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1972

"By no means as substantial a book as The Perfectionists (1970) but to be enjoyed for the very attractive distraction that it is."
A seductively accessorized short novel about beautiful people who live both too perfectly and quite imperfectly — Cameron Bolt, DA en route to the California Attorney Generalship, and his flawlessly lovely Francesca who is increasingly anomic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SOUTHERN FAMILY by Gail Godwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 2, 1987

"A 'slow march' (Clare's expression) of meditations in voices that sound somewhat similar (except for Snow's tangier diction), brightened by Godwin's acute sense of people paralyzed by circumstances—this is thoughtful chipping away at one family's crystalline certainties and disparate dreams."
Although centered on a violent murder/suicide that takes place early on, this is essentially a meditative, multi-voiced examination of the guilts, prides and lonely accommodations to social class and family myth-making—matters also addressed in A Mother and Two Daughters (1982)—among members of an unhappy North Carolina family immobilized under "layer upon layer of debilitating resentments and intrigues." Read full book review >