Search Results: "Peter Marsh"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 22, 2006

"A revelatory biography, particularly for Americans whose history classes treat Eastern Europe as the far side of the world."
Convincing proposal that one of the most inept and eccentric European rulers in a turbulent age was the ultimate promoter of the arts and sciences in Western culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRIBES by Desmond Morris
Released: Nov. 1, 1988

"The 100 photographs, 80 in color and many startling (full-body tattoos, scarred Africans, etc.), illustrate the text with punch; overall, though, this is just a well-packaged exercise in the obvious."
Second-rate (but nicely illustrated) anthropological musings on humanity's tribal ways; by Morris, best-selling author of The Naked Ape and Bodywatching, and Marsh, editor of Eye to Eye (p. 1144). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 28, 1979

"Thumbs up!"
This is a purely descriptive and in many ways a delightful, disarming book. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Breezy, blowsy, this is Bloomsbury for beginners."
Just when you thought it was safe to go back into the bookstores—here's another volume about Bloomsbury. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADMISSIONS by Henry Marsh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"Another thoughtful, painful, utterly fascinating mixture of nut-and-bolts brain surgery with a compassionate, workaholic surgeon's view of medicine around the world and his own limitations. Readers will hope that a third volume is in the works."
A retired British neurosurgeon delivers the follow-up to his well-received debut memoir, Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death, and Brain Surgery (2015). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STRANGE GLORY by Charles Marsh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 29, 2014

"There is no doubt Marsh's portrayal will infuse new controversy into discussions about Bonhoeffer for years to come."
A fresh look at Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945), both intimate and theological. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

101 MEN AND STILL ALONE by Marilyn Marsh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 19, 2013

"A book of curt, repetitive descriptions of sexual acts that squanders a chance at sincere self-examination."
Marsh's debut memoir details her years of dysfunctional relationships. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROM THE HEART by James Marsh
HUMOR
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"This should be a hot item in bookstores for Valentine's Day; it also suggests some creative uses for art or poetry classes. (Poetry/Picture book. YA)"
In the same delicately precise style and brilliant colors of his Bizarre Birds and Beasts (1991), Marsh paints plants and animals cleverly posed to form hearts as integral parts of the decorative designs illustrating his ``light-hearted verse'': a ram's horns (``Warm-Hearted,'' concluding, ``...I must declare that I love ewe''); the space between two hippos' open jaws (``Big-Hearted''); an autumnal pear (pair) tree (``Change of Heart''); a barbed-wired frame, dripping blood and entwined with roses, with tiny cupids to sharpen points and also offer bandaids (``Empty-Hearted''). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX AND THE LOST NOTE by Graham Marsh
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2010

"Disappointingly discordant. (Picture book. 4-6)"
A London-based art director and illustrator delivers a jazz-inspired effort whose snappy illustrations can't redeem its wobbly logic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JEPP, WHO DEFIED THE STARS by Katherine Marsh
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 9, 2012

"Despite the fact that the third part of the book pales in comparison to the first two, the honest and humorously self-deprecating voice of Jepp moves readers to rejoice with him as he seeks and manipulates his destiny. (Historical fiction. 12-18)"
Part coming-of-age novel and part paternity quest, this late-16th-century tale earns its distinction by virtue of its narrator: a dwarf. Read full book review >