Search Results: "Peter Neal"


BOOK REVIEW

STARTING AT ZERO by Jimi Hendrix
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"A must-read for fans and scholars of classic rock."
A posthumous "autobiography" of the rock god constructed from interviews, diaries, song lyrics, letters and other texts. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


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BOOK REVIEW

THE MAMMOTH ACADEMY by Neal Layton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"The decision by Oscar's new friend Fox to go unwashed as long as possible leads to all sorts of stinky humor that fits right in to this second-tier series opener. (Fantasy. 8-10)"
Scribbly illustrations dominating nearly every spread, Layton's latest plunks fledgling readers down amidst a student body of typical types who—atypically—happen to be mammoths, saber toothed tigers, ground sloths, cave bears and other early mammals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNWHOLLY by Neal Shusterman
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 28, 2012

"A breathless, unsettling read. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
After surviving the attack on the Happy Jack Harvest Camp, the heroes from Unwind (2007) lead the revolt against the Unwind Accord. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAD LOCKS by Neal Shusterman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2005

"Though there's nothing appealing about the thoroughly flat characters, the tension-filled climax puts a fascinating twist on the traditional way to defeat a gorgon. (Fantasy. 11-14)"
Goldilocks and the Three Bears doesn't blend well with the story of Medusa, but suspense keeps this thriller going until the end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2006

"Nicely disquieting. (Fantasy. 12-15)"
For the third entry in his Dark Fusion series, Shusterman gives another familiar tale both a contemporary setting (with some magic thrown in) and an ingenious, eerie twist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMILE IF YOU'RE HUMAN by Neal Layton
Released: March 1, 1999

"The goofy illustrations deploy a childlike sense of fun; the aliens are pleasant creatures with round patchwork bodies and eyes on stalks, and the gregarious zoo animals will ring true for the animal cracker set. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Layton's zany alien family comes to Earth in search of humans, but with only guidebook descriptions of what people look like, it's easy to make mistakes—especially when their flying saucer lands at the zoo! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCORPION SHARDS by Neal Shusterman
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Shusterman's dead-on portrayal of teenage phobias and his engaging, sympathetic characters combine in a haunting but ultimately reassuring novel. (Fiction. 12+)"
Shusterman (The Eye of Kid Midas, 1992, etc.) turns the pitfalls of adolescence into a landscape of nightmares, demonstrating that anyone can become a hero just by confronting old fears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EYES OF KID MIDAS by Neal Shusterman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"The story resembles Beatrice Gormley's tales of magic gone wrong, but it's much more sobering: The frequent gags and gaffes seem pale compared to the nightmarish plot; and it's hard to know whether to laugh at—or be chilled by—Kevin's predicament. (Fiction. 11-13)"
A terrifying, somewhat confused reworking of a familiar theme: When Kevin Midas, smallest kid in class, finds a talisman that grants wishes but can't reverse them, events quickly escape his control. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2008

"Not for those who know their babka from their bupkis."
New York Times contributor Karlen (Shanda: The Making and Breaking of a Self-Loathing Jew, 2004, etc.) proffers an idiosyncratic take on Yiddish, the heroic vernacular that gets no respect. Read full book review >