Search Results: "Peter Reinhart"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 22, 1994

"Spiritual (not preachy) and sweet (not saccharine)."
Reinhart (Brother Juniper's Bread Book, not reviewed) is back with philosophical musings and recipes from the California restaurant he and his wife began as members of a Christian order. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INSECT-LO-PEDIA by Matthew Reinhart
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Reinhart offers no back matter, either. (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
Plainly intent on cramming the heads of budding naturalists with insect facts while communicating his own enthusiasm for the critters, Reinhart sandwiches quick looks at 26 sorts, from bristletails and cockroaches to ants and butterflies, between general comments on their common characteristics, and their medical, gustatory, and ecological relationships with us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEGO POP-UP by Matthew Reinhart
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Inspiring fare for paper crafters and Lego-manes alike. (Pop-up informational picture book. 7-10)"
A soaring 3-D tribute to "the world's most beloved toy." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINDERELLA by Matthew Reinhart
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"Reinhart's retelling is solid from start to happily-ever-after finish. (Pop-up book. 4-8)"
Poor Cinderella. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"The topic will make this a crowd pleaser, but not even rabid dino or Sabuda fans are likely to pay it more than a single visit. (Nonfiction pop-up. 5-10)"
From capering Eoraptor, "the tiny terror of the early Triassic" to a ravening T. rex lunging up at viewers as its spread opens, this gallery of dinosaurs will elicit the "Ooooohs" of admiration that Sabuda's work always does, though it's not up to his usual standard, either visually or in paper design. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO BITING LOUISE by Margie Palatini
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Mark Burchall (2001), or Elizabeth Verdick's Teeth Are Not for Biting, illustrated by Marieka Heinlen (2003). (Picture book. 3-5)"
A knockoff from two respected veterans who usually do better. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


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