Search Results: "Peter S. Temes"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 13, 1983

"Crass stuff, then, neither funny nor involving, and more like a pornfilm scenario (without the hard-core porn) than a novel—but sure to attract an audience with the Sanders byline, the intriguing opening pages, and the heavily sexual premise."
The smirky, undramatic rise of a male prostitute—in a long, frankly plotless novel (171 teensy chapters) that offers Sanders' cheery vulgarity without any of his talent for mystery/suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2012

"Illuminating homilies of the Jewish people, by the Jewish people and, particularly, for the Jewish people."
Reflecting on his faith, an educator decodes some snapshots from the Jewish family album. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PETER by Kate Walker
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"David, a wiser head, comfortable with his preference, one who can offer physical affection without sexual overtones; and, in Peter, a realistically distressed teenager who is finally able to muster enough perspective to weather his crisis. (Fiction. YA)"
When he finds himself attracted to his older brother's gay friend David, Peter is plunged into the kind of sexual uncertainty many young men feel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PETER JENNINGS by Kate Darnton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"Evocative glimpses of a sorely missed class act."
A warm tribute to the Canadian high-school dropout who anchored ABC's World News Tonight for 22 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 5, 1971

"And a serious piece by Carolyn Heilbrun from The American Scholar attesting to the 'enduring' grace of Lord Peter."
A fond recapitulation of the contribution of Dorothy Sayers by James Sandoe who edited this collection running to 430 pages and ending with a parody Codetta by E. C. Bentley. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S&M by Jeffrey DeShell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1997

STATEMENT PAGE Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. S by George Jacobs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 2003

"Deliciously gossipy, yet Sinatra is recalled with affection rather than spite."
As-told-to memoir of life with the famous crooner by his African-American Man Friday, lubricated with racy tales about the stars, the Kennedys, and the Mob. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S/Z by Roland Barthes
Released: Sept. 9, 1974

"Barthes has brought new life to a foundering literary aesthetics with this synthesis of science and imaginative humanism, for those familiar with the terminology."
In this essential application of structural linguistics to the problems of literary criticism, Roland Barthes—a disciple of Saussure and one of the cardinal spokesmen of semiology—opposes both the goals and methods of classic rhetoric. Read full book review >