Search Results: "Peter Schechter"


BOOK REVIEW

PIPELINE by Peter Schechter
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 3, 2009

"The thriller as position paper, with too much explication and not enough suspense."
When the lights start going out in America, power brokers around the world start maneuvering to control the remaining energy sources. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POINT OF ENTRY by Peter Schechter
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 2006

"Hilarious, but, alas, unintentionally so."
A corrupt Syrian ambassador, a Colombian drug cartel, a scheme to secret several kilos of nuclear material into the United States—it's just the sort of thing to keep a Homeland Security head up all night. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 28, 1989

A neat title for a first-rate account of the discovery of high(er) temperature superconductivity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 10, 1998

"Schechter has mined his sources well to create a captivating portrait."
A pleasing biography of the mathematician (the second this season after Paul Hoffman's The Man Who Loved Only Numbers, p. 795) by physicist, editor, and journalist Schechter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEVERMORE by Harold Schechter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Good atmosphere, dull story."
Davy Crockett meets Edgar Allan Poe—and together they set out in search of Baltimore's 1830s equivalent of John Wayne Gacy: a gothic thriller (and first hardcover fiction) from Schechter (Depraved: The Shocking Story of America's First Serial Killer, 1994, etc.) Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Masterful research, although some material appears to function as a story-stretcher."
A popular true-crime writer offers his fifth in a chilling series on serial killers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUM BUG by Harold Schechter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 13, 2001

"Nonetheless, a worthy addition to the famous-dead-people-as-private-investigators genre. Here, the hero is treated as a real person, not a stiff literary icon."
A killer's on the loose in mid-19th-century New York, and it's up to a cunning showman and a gloomy scribbler to catch him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MASK OF RED DEATH by Harold Schechter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 3, 2004

"If only one could say the same for The Mask of Red Death."
Frontier scout Kit Carson and the nefarious "Mountain Man" known as "Liver-Eating Johnson" cross paths with Edgar Allan Poe in crime researcher Schechter's third period mystery (The Hum Bug, 2001, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"A bloody fine riposte to those who would censor with clouded hindsight and muddy reasoning."
Why the good old days were actually often quite nasty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 23, 2007

"Skillfully captures a colorful mishmash of New York characters caught up in a moment of extreme public anxiety."
A terrifically overwrought buildup eventually leads to the turn-of-the-century murder trial and eventual acquittal of New Jersey chemist Roland Burnham Molineux. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAD SCULPTOR by Harold Schechter
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 18, 2014

"For readers who enjoy the stories of the sensationalistic press of the 1930s and its crass exploitation of the details of horrific murders; not for fans of clever police work or investigative reporting."
The fiendish story of "mad sculptor" Robert Irwin (1908-1975), featuring "the kind of lurid goings-on that speak to the secret dreams and dangerous desires of the public." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"Possesses all the elements of lurid true crime and dark early American history."
Energetic Wild West tale about two enterprising brothers whose determination to make something of themselves came to radically different ends. Read full book review >