Search Results: "Peter W. Barnes"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 18, 2013

"The runt of the litter of print titles and websites covering the topic. (bibliography, notes for adult readers) (Informational picture book. 6-8)"
This tally of presidential pets reads like a school report (for all that the author is a journalist for Fox Business Network) and isn't helped by its suite of amateurish illustrations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAESTRO MOUSE AND THE MYSTERY OF THE MISSING BATON by Peter W. Barnes
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 7, 2013

"Audiences can skip this amateur hour at the National Symphony. (notes for parents and teachers, matching game, facts, a page for a written response) (Informational picture book. 6-8)"
When Maestro Mouse loses his baton, a group of young concertgoers conduct a search through all the sections of the orchestra. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 21, 2012

"Vote—but not for this candidate. (resources for parents and teachers, additional information and activities, reproducible 'contract to vote.') (Picture book. 4-8)"
A mouse with a smile as wide as Ike's and outstretched arms as expansive as Nixon's runs a successful campaign for the presidency. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: June 1, 2002

"Hassinger relies on long passages of simile-laden narrative, which can be lyrical when describing the Hudson River area, the story's setting, but fails to inject the necessary dramatic force. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Eleven-year old Sander, who has just moved to the country with his family, sets off to explore his new surroundings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 22, 1994

"The answer would have been of interest to the hundreds of thousands who died on the Cold War's proxy battlefields."
Rodman swerves from objective scholarship to partisan cheerleading in this chronicle of the struggle between the US and the Soviet Union for control in the Third World. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 27, 1991

"Huber's appeal to good science and the noble search for truth are to be commended, but, it should be noted, manufacturers do make mistakes that cost lives, victims are often innocent, and medical science has yet to reach consensus concerning the cause and cure of many an ailment."
A polemic twice as long as it should be by lawyer/engineer Huber (Liability, 1988), now taking aim at the hired-hand expert witnesses who are called upon in liability cases where appeal to science is the issue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"Huber's political polemics detract somewhat from an otherwise intriguing discussion."
Legal expert Huber (The Bottomless Well: The Twilight of Fuel, the Virtue of Waste, and Why We Will Never Run Out of Energy, 2006, etc.) contends that government intervention in the science and practice of medicine is impeding progress. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAKESPEARE’S DAUGHTER by Peter W. Hassinger
BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 1, 2004

"There's spirited talk about language, theater, and most especially about music, and the plot elopes with ease. (Historical fiction. 10+)"
A lively fictional account of Susanna, the eldest child of Will Shakespeare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 15, 2013

"Some inspiring content packaged in a generic, unengaging way."
Iscol and Cookson bring together 12 stories of activists who made an impact on a population through philanthropy, activism and businesses focused on the well-being of others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

BARNUM by Jr. Kunhardt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"This book is likely to create a whole new crop of adoring fans."
Phineas Taylor Barnum (181091) was the greatest showman this country has ever produced. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


Read the full post >