Search Results: "Peter de Jonge"


BOOK REVIEW

MIRACLE ON THE 17TH GREEN by James Patterson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 4, 1996

"Quite entertaining but too vulgar for kids."
Preceded by the release of the Kevin Costner film Tin Cup, and by the literary flourishes of John Updike's Golf Dreams, thriller-writer Patterson (Jack and Jill, p. 998, etc.) and journalist de Jonge's Christmas fantasy about a poor-in-spirit advertising copywriter becoming a finalist at the PGA Senior Open looks like a sales shoo-in. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURIED ON AVENUE B by Peter de Jonge
Released: July 24, 2012

"De Jonge seasons what might have been a routine procedural with a heroine who's sensitive without being tiresome and a half-dozen nifty surprises."
Manhattan South's Detective Darlene O'Hara (Shadows Still Remain, 2009) scours the eastern seaboard for the truth about a grisly discovery in a community garden. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHADOWS STILL REMAIN by Peter de Jonge
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 2009

"An abhorrent crime, a slimy perp and a noirish prose style—all good but all derivative."
In his first solo effort, James Patterson co-author de Jonge (Beach Road, 2006, etc.) introduces NYPD Det. Darlene O'Hara, charged with solving a grisly murder that's getting scads of publicity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEACH HOUSE by James Patterson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 10, 2002

"A vigilante pipe-dream topped off by toothlessly shocking revelations about characters even less substantial than the celebrity cameos: Dominick Dunne, Latrell Sprewell, Geraldo Rivera, and Billy 'Mudman' Simon."
Not to fear: Just because megaselling Patterson has teamed up once more with journalist collaborator de Jonge (Miracle on the 17th Green, 1996) doesn't make the pace of this slick, ludicrous thriller any slower, the puppets any more complex, or the sentences any longer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOTES by Peter van de Kamp
Released: Oct. 2, 2000

"An insubstantial and unsatisfying first effort."
A slender, even slight, volume from literary scholar and biographer van de Kamp, an expert in Anglo-Irish and Dutch literatures, currently teaching at the Institute of Technology in Tralee. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHUCK AND DANIELLE by Peter Dickinson
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Hats off to a winning canine antihero. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 9-11)"
The author of Shadow of a Hero (1994) and other profound, stimulating longer novels demonstrates his versatility with this brief, light-as-air tale of a highstrung whippet, nicknamed Chuck, and her fond young keeper, Danielle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FINN McCOUL by Brian Gleeson
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"This collaboration is uproarious, a brain-fevered interpretation that's also smart as a whip. (Picture book/folklore. 8+)"
Out of the third century a.d. comes Finn McCoul (a.k.a. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POPE PATRICK by Peter de Rosa
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 1997

"Not terribly funny, nor wonderfully sharp, and occasionally downright irksome in its reliance on stereotype: a cartoon for grownups."
The Quiet Man steps into The Shoes of the Fisherman and goes for a long walk in the O'Learys' cow pasture—all in de Rosa's (Vicars of Christ, 1989, etc.) would-be apocalyptic parody of religious and political life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Lavish spreads set against refreshing white space playfully merge the ordinary with the extraordinary, giving readers a fey and enchanting world to peruse—a high-spirited salute to the adage that opposites attract. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The free-spirited Duchess of Whimsy finds little to recommend the staid Earl of Norm, who is pragmatism personified. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CROWS & CARDS by Joseph Helgerson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 6, 2009

"An enjoyable romp in the spirit of Twain. (bibliography, glossary) (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
It's 1849, and "twelve-year-olds don't have much bargaining power," so Zebulon Crabtree finds himself shipped off to his great-uncle Seth in St. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

PETER WATSON
by Gregory McNamee

Five hundred-odd years ago, in the time of Leonardo da Vinci, a scientist—a term then unknown—was a person of many parts, someone who might work in fields ranging from chemistry to botany, astronomy to metallurgy, to divine the hidden order of the universe.

Even as recently as the early Victorian idea, writes British science historian Peter Watson in his new ...


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