Search Results: "Philip Dowell"


BOOK REVIEW

BABY'S BOOK OF THE BODY by Roger Priddy
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 8, 1996

In a trademark format—crisp photographic images set against a milky white backdrop—Priddy's exploration of the baby's body, with its dozens of separate full-color photos to be pored over and mused upon, is easy for children to linger over. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A STAR-BRIGHT LIE by Coleman Dowell
Released: June 14, 1993

"Plenty of purple raisins, but this cake never rises."
Torso of an autobiography by novelist/songwriter Dowell (The Houses of Children, 1987, etc.), found among his papers after his 1985 suicide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALLING IN by Frances O’Roark Dowell
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 9, 2010

"Dowell spreads her wings and soars. (Magical adventure. 10-14)"
A master at capturing the emotional lives of modern kids in realistic fiction proves equally adept with fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SOUND OF YOUR VOICE, ONLY REALLY FAR AWAY by Frances O’Roark Dowell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 27, 2013

"Another quietly perceptive tour de force. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Dowell returns to middle schoolers Kate and Marylin, whose friendship she has sensitively anatomized in The Secret Language of Girls (2004) and The Kind of Friends We Used to Be (2009). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE I’D LIKE TO BE by Frances O’Roark Dowell
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"The talky, pie-in-the-sky resolution mars the tightness of the narrative that precedes it, but taken as a whole, this is a lovely, quietly bittersweet tale of friendship and family. (Fiction. 10-14)"
An orphaned girl creates, with friends, a remarkable shelter that allows them to dream of a permanent home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOVEY COE by Frances O’Roark Dowell
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2000

"This fabulously feisty heroine will win your heart. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Proud mountainfolk, the Coe family has resided in Indian Creek, North Carolina, since 1844. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEN MILES PAST NORMAL by Frances O’Roark Dowell
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 22, 2011

"That's a lot of ground to cover, and the plot occasionally teeters under the weight of its many developments and down-home secondary characters, but Janie's voice—anxious, funny and winning—holds it all together as she finds and takes her place at school and on the farm. (Fiction. 11-14)"
A quirky coming-of-age for girls ready to discover their cool aunt's stash of vintage copies of Sassy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHOOTING THE MOON by Frances O’Roark Dowell
ADVENTURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Ineffably wise and picture-perfect. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Having been raised in the Gospel According to the Colonel all her life, confirmed Army brat Jamie Dexter (who'll be 13 in December and therefore knows everything) is mystified when her father—the Colonel—seems less-than-delighted at her brother's choice to forego college for a tour in Vietnam. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANYBODY SHINING by Frances O’Roark Dowell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 26, 2014

"Still, Arie is a superbly appealing girl, and the details and encounters of her daily life offer a fine glimpse of a particular time and place. (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
Life in a 1920s North Carolina mountain community is warmly detailed through letters 12-year-old Arie Mae Sparks writes to a cousin she's never met. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHICKEN BOY by Frances O’Roark Dowell
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2005

"Tobin's own blossoming, through friendship, and the rediscovery of his family, and the love for and of his chickens, is entirely satisfying—just right. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Seventh-grader Tobin has pretty much flown under the radar most of his life, only stealing a paper clip now and then to prove his relationship to the rest of his juvenile-delinquent family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TROUBLE THE WATER by Frances O’Roark Dowell
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 3, 2016

"Readers who identify with Wendell may feel a call to action; those who identify with Callie may just be exasperated at the inaction. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
It's 1953 in Celeste, Kentucky, and 11-year-old Callie Robinson wants to report news for the local black newspaper, the Advance. Wendell Crow is quite the opposite; the white boy spends his summer days by the river, hoping no one will notice him. Read full book review >