Search Results: "Philip Dray"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2005

"Very little that shocks or illuminates. (Illustrated throughout)"
Yes, he actually flew that kite, and his greatest invention, the lightning rod, occasioned great debates about humankind's audacious interference with God's judgments. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 14, 2010

"In the end, Dray's account is evenhanded—not all bosses are bad, not all activists good—but it is clear where his sympathies lie, especially in his prescriptions for a renewed international labor movement for the future."
Exemplary history of the American labor movement, from its time-shrouded beginnings to its murky present. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 16, 2008

"A welcome addition to the literature of the Civil War and Reconstruction Era, and important for students of the civil-rights movement and its origins."
Impeccably written study of the brief post-Civil War period in which African-Americans were admitted to Congress—with the door subsequently closed to them for the next century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 22, 2002

"This is history most fundamental, the kind that forces us to ponder the very nature of humanity."
The ghastly story of lynching, by the coauthor of We Are Not Afraid: The Story of Goodman, Schwerner, Chaney, and the Civil Rights Campaign for Mississippi. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

The author of an adult study of the history of lynching addresses a younger audience in this stirring tribute to an African-American journalist who, more than any other single figure, is associated with bringing the despicable practice to an end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1993

"At once fascinating and horrifying: a timely study of one scientific advance that proved to be a decidedly mixed blessing. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
Shifting from civil-rights history (We Are Not Afraid, 1988) to an especially tragic path of 20th-century progress, Cagin and Dray offer a well-written, devastatingly detailed chronicle of the widespread use of CFCs over more than 60 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOUGAL THE GARBAGE DUMP BEAR by Matt Dray
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"A heartfelt message at tale's end regarding triumphing over adversity proves that this odd duckling of a story is truly a swan. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In this quirky tale about a tattered teddy's second chance, readers follow the travails of Dougal, rescued at the dump by a truck operator. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BE AN ACCOMPLICE
by Michelle Martin

In Philip Nel’s newly published monograph Was the Cat in the Hat Black?, he concludes his intriguing analysis of the insidious and steadfast presence of racism in children’s literature historically with a manifesto, a concrete list of “action items” that children’s-literature professionals can do to start to make the genre an inclusive one. Point No. 11 of the manifesto is ...


Read the full post >

BLOG POST

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE: FORERUNNER TO AMERICAN HORROR
by Andrew Liptak

It’s almost a rite of passage in high school: your English teacher takes out Nathaniel Hawthorne’s classic American novel The Scarlet Letter, and you, as a student, have to slog through the antiquated prose and story for several weeks. Friends and family don’t remember the book fondly, but recently, I’ve begun to understand just how critical The Scarlet Letter and ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICA'S FIRST DAUGHTER by Stephanie Dray
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2016

"A thorough and well-researched if sometimes flowery saga of the Jefferson family."
A Founding Father's daughter tells all! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WINTER HORSES by Philip Kerr
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 25, 2014

"A worthwhile-enough read for kids particularly interested in history and/or horses. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Kerr, well-known for his best-selling World War II thrillers for adults (A Man Without Breath, 2013, etc.), enters YA territory with a compelling but ultimately flawed tale of saving the last Przewalski's horses from Nazi invaders. Read full book review >