Search Results: "Philip Jenkins"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GREAT AND HOLY WAR by Philip Jenkins
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2014

"A work of intensely nuanced research."
A painstaking, densely layered study of the many slippery uses of religion in the making of war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A worthy broadside aimed at revisionist Christian historians that provides a sorely needed counterpoint to the prevailing and largely unquestioned conventional wisdom regarding early Christian history."
Jenkins (History, Institute for the Studies of Religion/Baylor Univ.; The Great and Holy War: How World War I Became a Religious Crusade, 2014, etc.) attacks the current mainstream view of church history, which posits the disappearance of competing Christian literature due to early repression by the established orthodoxy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2008

"Complex material ably digested for the lay reader."
Deeply erudite, sure-to-be-controversial history of the persecution of Christian churches throughout the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2000

"A fresh and thoughtful analysis that sheds much-needed light on an often overheated phenomenon."
A fascinating look at the importance of the religious fringe in American life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 19, 2017

"A well-written, intriguing account of the centuries that set the stage for modern Judaism, the Christianity taught by Paul, and, eventually, Islam as an heir to both."
An exploration of an underrated era and its effect on religious history. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BEVERLY JENKINS
by Poornima Apte

If Beverly Jenkins had her way, her novels would have many more history nuggets than they do. But then, she says, she has to remind herself that she is writing romance, not a history book. The veteran award-winning writer of African-American historical fiction novels has dozens of books under her belt and knows it’s a fine line to walk between ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

EYE TO EYE by Steve Jenkins
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2014

"Another impressive presentation from a master craftsman. (Informational picture book. 6-10)"
The evolution of the eye and the surprising ways animals see the world are displayed in a thoughtfully designed and engagingly illustrated album. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIVING COLOR by Steve Jenkins
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 10, 2007

"Extra facts about coloration and thumbnails providing basic information about each animal depicted make up the backmatter of this volume, which is guaranteed to be a browser's delight. (Nonfiction. 4-8)"
Color becomes the organizing factor in this new exploration of the quirks of the animal world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOKING DOWN by Steve Jenkins
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"As with Banyai's Zoom (p. 220) and Re-Zoom (see review, above), Jenkins's original idea may have been to hurtle viewers in the direction he chose (in this case, ever closer to the scene), but the book reads equally well backwards. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Torn- and cut-paper collage pictures without words begin with a view of the earth from distant outer space and, with each turn of the page, zoom in toward the planet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD by Ellie Jenkins
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2017

"With about the same amount of effort children can make their own masks from scratch—and act out less-superficial renditions of the stories too. (Novelty/folk tale. 6-8)"
This reworked version of the classic tale keeps everyone uneaten and alive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEADLIEST! by Steve Jenkins
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"A solid informational reader that is not at all deadly. (Informational early reader. 6-10)"
Jenkins' talent is highlighting weird, fantastical, and, in this case, dangerous animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1998

"Entertaining and informative, worth reading even by non-Trekkies. (For another look at Star Trek, see Jeff Greenwald, Future Perfect, p. 712.)"
Here's another—probably not the last—in the recent batch of books explaining modern science by referring to popular sci-fi shows. Read full book review >