Search Results: "Philip Roth"


BOOK REVIEW

JOSEPH ROTH by Joseph Roth
Released: Jan. 16, 2012

"A quintessential depiction of one man's view from the brink of the abyss."
The doomed world of interwar Europe comes to burning life in the anguished correspondence of the peripatetic Austrian novelist/journalist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROTH UNBOUND by Claudia Roth Pierpont
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 22, 2013

"Although not a substitute for a full biography, Pierpont's book offers a candid and sympathetic portrait of an audacious writer."
An insightful portrait of a creative life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INDIGNATION by Philip Roth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2008

"A twist in narrative perspective reinforces this novel's timelessness."
In a plot that evokes the author's earlier work, Roth (Exit Ghost, 2007, etc.) focuses on a young man's collegiate coming of age against the deadly backdrop of the Korean War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUMAN STAIN by Philip Roth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 10, 2000

"Roth's late maturity looks more and more like his golden age."
Roth's extraordinary recent productivity (the prizewinning Sabbath's Theater, 1995, and American Pastoral, 1997) continues apace with this impressively replete and very moving chronicle of an academic scandal and its impact on both the aging professor at its center and his friend—alter ego novelist Nathan Zuckerman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATRIMONY by Philip Roth
Released: Feb. 11, 1990

Roth has used the relationship between his life and art in a gimmicky way in his fiction, and even his brutal memoir The Facts (1988) was not free of this defect. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PROFESSOR OF DESIRE by Philip Roth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 1977

"From the waist down, then—the same old story, sans laughs; but, in head and heart—a subdued and seductive journey."
In 1972, the mature David Kepesh told us how he turned into The Breast, but here are his earlier, less symbolic guises—child of the Borscht Belt, scholar of Chekhov and Kafka, and wrestler with temptation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

READING MYSELF AND OTHERS by Philip Roth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 30, 1975

"This time anyone can play Dr. Spielvogel."
This is an act of self-vindication, an expression of Philip Roth's "continuing need for self-analysis and self-justification," a valiant defense of the naked and exposed "moral flank" some critics have found obscene. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KING PHILIP by Esther Averill
Released: Oct. 18, 1950

"Mark this as a three star attraction — for school, regional interest and a swell story."
A thrilling and sincerely conceived story of the great chief of the Narragansett Indians who led a "rebellion" against the New England colonists in 1675. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DYING ANIMAL by Philip Roth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 18, 2001

"'This need. This derangement. Will it never stop?,' Roth's most sexually importunate figure demands of himself. Probably not—and we'll probably be treated to further ruminations on why this should be so in a future David Kepesh novel."
The recent creative surge that has produced some of Roth's best fiction continues with this intense short novel narrated by David Kepesh (protagonist also of The Breast and The Professor of Desire), who's a more highly eroticized counterpart of Roth's other serial alter ego, Nathan Zuckerman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY LIFE AS A MAN by Philip Roth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 3, 1974

"So Nu, 'Let's begin."
The opener here — one of two stories which goes by the name of "Useful Fictions" — is by Peter Tarnopol and about Nathan Zuckerman who is of course Peter Tarnopol who is of course Philip Roth recording his life as a man already only too recognizable as that of the mensch manque — the Jewish boy from New Jersey who was such a public nuisance in the public library and such a misfit in the Army and who became "the golden boy of American literature" (1959 — hello, goodbye) and then went on to teach in a midwestern college where he became hopelessly entrammeled with two women. I.e. — the basis of what will be shamefully appropriated as useful non-fiction (a case study) by Dr. Spielvogel who also reappears and considers him "among the top young narcissists in the arts." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BREAST by Philip Roth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 21, 1972

"70 pages — no bigger than an A-cup."
This is no more than a titbit by way of a diversion in the event that you divert easily as once again with downcast eyes Mr. Roth tells the story of David Alan Kepesh, poor nebbish David Alan Kepesh, who having observed the small pink stain on his glans penis suddenly finds himself transformed into a breast. Read full book review >