Search Results: "Philip Warburg"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 17, 2012

"Although Warburg summarily dismisses the potential of solar energy as a major part of the clean-energy mix, his arguments about wind power are balanced and informative."
Warburg believes that that collaboration between the government and the private sector can make wind power a major source of energy for the generation of power in the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARNESS THE SUN by Philip Warburg
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"A clear and persuasive report that is not so much electrifying as smoothly edifying."
For the future of green energy, the forecast is sunny. That's the message in this manual on the present state of solar energy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSIE AND THE NIGHTMARES by Philip Waechter
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"Similarly, the seemingly random arrangement of illustration types (full bleed, spot, cropped and more) is redeemed by the constant presence of the small, determined heroine, whose outlook seems rosy indeed. (Picture book. 3-7)"
In this amusing paean to overcoming monster-sized fears, Rosie wakes shaking from yet another nightmare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAPES by Philip Giordano
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"A winner. (Board book. 1-3)"
Lifting flaps reveal the simple geometry underlying the world around us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BREAK-UP ARTIST by Philip Siegel
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 1, 2014

"A true chick-lit charmer, ideal for a chilly winter night or a sunny beach chair. (Chick-lit/romance. 12-16)"
Breakin' up may be hard to do but not if you get a little help from a cynical teenager who's found a niche market for her special skills. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCRIVENER'S MOON by Philip Reeve
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Nov. 1, 2012

"Quiet and somber, but still deeply satisfying. (Steampunk. 13 & up)"
The third (and final?) Fever Crumb story reminds readers of the serious themes beneath Reeve's often madcap, always entertaining tales. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2004

"Dahl and Snicket fans will find themselves on familiar ground. (Fiction. 10-12)"
The famously large and hairy author of the "Eddie Dickens" trilogy opens a new trio of Unfortunate Events—er, "Unlikely Exploits," with the fatal plummet of young Fergal McNally from a 14th-floor window. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DARKLING PLAIN by Philip Reeve
Released: May 29, 2007

"All stops are pulled out in this pyrotechnic conclusion that follows multiple narratives with such rapid-fire transitions that it will have readers gasping for breath—and humming with satisfaction at the just-right end. (Fiction. 12+)"
Taking his cue from "Dover Beach," Matthew Arnold's musing on isolation and anxiety in a world without faith, Reeve delivers a suitably explosive finish to his grueling Hungry City Chronicles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WEB OF AIR by Philip Reeve
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"Imaginative, inventive and exciting. (Steampunk. 12 & up)"
Fever Crumb is back! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

Better known on this side of the Atlantic for series nonfiction, Ardagh kicks off what promises to be yet another Dickensian farce with this tale of an 11-year-old buffeted by winds of silliness. Read full book review >