Search Results: "Philippe Béha"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GOLDEN TOUCH by Glen Huser
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 15, 2015

"This appealing stage version of a classic cautionary tale makes, at best, a richly illustrated but labored transition to print. (production notes) (Mythology. 6-11)"
The Canadian creators of Time for Flowers, Time for Snow (2013) turn another myth into a musical performance—this one with comical overtones.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KING HAS GOAT EARS by Katarina Jovanovic
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Sadly, there is no source note. (Picture book/folktale. 4-7)"
Jovanovic's debut adapts a Serbian variant of a King Midas story, placing the emphasis on acceptance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Notes on the stories and on the recipes fill sidebars, and these are clear, accurate and engaging to both young and older readers. (Fairytales/cookbook. 8-14)"
For a really nice idea wonderfully fulfilled, Yolen retells very familiar tales in versions lively, brief and energetic: Little Red Riding Hood, The Little Mermaid, Cinderella and a number of others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAPA! by Philippe Corentin
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: June 1, 1997

"Warm and funny fare. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A humorous reminder, in the same spirit as Jackie French Koller's No Such Thing (p. 60), that monsters are monsters only in the eye of the beholder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BUSY DAY AT THE GARAGE by Philippe Dupasquier
FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"Bright, boisterous, fun; for children who take to the format, there are two companion volumes: A Busy Day at the Airport (ISBN 1-56402-591-8) and A Busy Day at the Building Site (592-6). (Picture book. 4+)"
A rural, pleasantly ramshackle garage is the setting for this lively book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOT SO VERY LONG AGO by Philippe Fix
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"An attractive European equivalent to a visit to, say, Massachusetts's Sturbridge Village, though the generic nature of the northern European setting may trouble those readers who know the area well. (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
Written by a Parisian, first published in Germany, and erroneously classified in 973.8 by LC, a portrayal of European village life 100 years ago, at its most serene. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"Beginning and ending with huge, eye-filling elevated overviews, this sketchbook makes an irresistible invitation to dream of rural idylls and days gone by. (Picture book. 5-10)"
With a series of oversized watercolors'so large, in fact, that the book will be impractical to shelve—awash in nostalgia, Dumas squires readers about a prosperous English farm back when the plumbing was out of doors and steam engines were innovations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONSEQUENCES by Philippe Djian
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"Bold, elliptical, fashionably inconclusive and very French."
Djian (Unforgivable, 2010, etc.) provides further insights into what randy French academics are up to when they're not deconstructing everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOUSSAINT LOUVERTURE by Philippe Girard
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"A groundbreaking biography that underscores the difficulties of leading slaves to freedom and avoiding violent extremes."
A biography of the man who challenged the power of the leading empires of his day and led the only successful slave revolt in human history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 15, 1999

"Well intentioned, but remarkably tedious for such a short book."
Another attempt to jump on the bandwagon of the so-called simplicity movement, this time with a Gallic twist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROSY FUTURE OF WAR by Philippe Delmas
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1997

"A stimulating, if at times frightening, outlook on the possibility that war may become widespread, and a rational strategy for its prevention."
French military analyst Delmas argues for a new world order based not on encouraging the growth of democracy but on ensuring the stability of states. Read full book review >