Search Results: "Philippe Margotin"


BOOK REVIEW

ALL THE SONGS by Philippe Margotin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 23, 2013

"Essential for Beatles fans and a pleasure to read."
Quick: What's the last cover the Beatles ever recorded? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KNOCK! KNOCK! KNOCK! WHO'S THERE? by Philippe Goossens
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"Pass. (Picture book. 4-6)"
In this guess-who's-knocking title, the clues are either too vague or too easy, the story is slight, and the illustrations are a tad pedestrian. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE by Philippe Dupasquier
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2005

"Here's a game worth playing—for everyone, not just budding visual artists. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Dupasquier invites readers to battle boredom by taking a good look around. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BENJAMIN BEAR IN FUZZY THINKING by Philippe Coudray
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 23, 2011

"A visually formatted joke book to inspire thinking as well as laughs. (Graphic early reader. 4-6)"
Benjamin Bear deals with life in his own straightforward way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDY'S PIRATE SHIP by Philippe Dupasquier
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 1994

"An unusually well-crafted entry in a popular genre. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Here's a Waldo spinoff with extra dimensions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAPA! by Philippe Corentin
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: June 1, 1997

"Warm and funny fare. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A humorous reminder, in the same spirit as Jackie French Koller's No Such Thing (p. 60), that monsters are monsters only in the eye of the beholder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BUSY DAY AT THE GARAGE by Philippe Dupasquier
FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"Bright, boisterous, fun; for children who take to the format, there are two companion volumes: A Busy Day at the Airport (ISBN 1-56402-591-8) and A Busy Day at the Building Site (592-6). (Picture book. 4+)"
A rural, pleasantly ramshackle garage is the setting for this lively book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOT SO VERY LONG AGO by Philippe Fix
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"An attractive European equivalent to a visit to, say, Massachusetts's Sturbridge Village, though the generic nature of the northern European setting may trouble those readers who know the area well. (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
Written by a Parisian, first published in Germany, and erroneously classified in 973.8 by LC, a portrayal of European village life 100 years ago, at its most serene. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PARISIAN FROM KANSAS by Philippe Tapon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 1997

"An assured and entertaining debut that will make readers curious to see what its talented author will turn his hand to next."
A clever and almost consistently amusing debut, part Nabokov and part John Irving, about the writing of ``a self-referent novel about life and death.'' The life is that of Darren Swenson, a native midwesterner who grows up gay and disillusioned with his corn-fed all-American ancestry and milieu (Immaculatum, Kansas), strikes out for Manhattan and brief fulfillment working as a call boy (for ``Star Studs''), and makes his way to the City of Light, where, HIV- positive and ebullient to the last, he plans to spend his remaining days surrounded by sympathetic lovers and friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 30, 1996

"Descola's fine ethnographic writing, along with his critical remarks on the anthropological enterprise, make this book of a piece with LÇvi-Strauss's landmark Tristes Tropiques. (b&w photos, not seen)"
An uncommonly well written ethnology of a part of the world much imagined and little visited. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KINSHIP by Philippe Wamba
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"The best book dealing with the African half of the compound African-American."
A strange, wonderful hybrid of memoir and history by a man who has periodically lived as an African and an African-American. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Old news in stale language—not a happy combination."
Powerful people have done—and will probably always do—bad things to accumulate more power and riches and opportunities for sex: that's the not-very-startling thesis of this bite-sized history of the world. Read full book review >