Search Results: "Phoebe Lapine"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 24, 2011

"Easy-to-read recipes for all occasions, whether eating alone, with a date or partying with friends."
Two young cooks serve up 100 recipes and real-world culinary tips. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SONYA'S CHICKENS by Phoebe Wahl
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"A reassuring story about death in the natural world, thoughtfully designed and illustrated. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A father's thoughtful explanation provides a helpful perspective for a child's loss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING FROM NOTHING by Phoebe Gilman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Nice. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-11)"
When Joseph is born, his grandfather fashions a beautiful blue blanket embroidered with stars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN THE WIND BEARS GO DANCING by Phoebe Stone
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Stone's woolly cloud creatures will bring comfort to little ones distressed by thunder claps; a striking nighttime palette of purple, deep blue, and orange perfectly counters any sentimentalism in the text. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A rhyme to soften the roar of thunderclouds and the flash of lightning by transforming them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOY ON CINNAMON STREET by Phoebe Stone
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"An outstanding tale of love, loss and the true power of friendship. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Something terrible happened to seventh-grader Louise's parents, and only the kindly ministrations of an unknown admirer can pull her back from her insulating—suffocating—layers of denial. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHISPER by Phoebe Kitanidis
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2010

"Although the too-tidy ending feels rushed and the story is not as solid as Lisa McMann's Wake trilogy, fans of the genre will likely enjoy it. (Paranormal. YA)"
Just like her older sister, Jessica, her mother and every female ancestor before her, 15-year-old Joy Stefani can "Hear" people's innermost desires, which her family calls "Whispers." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROMEO BLUE by Phoebe Stone
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2013

"Patient readers will nevertheless enjoy this combination spy novel/coming-of-age story. (Historical fiction. 11-16)"
In the sequel to The Romeo and Juliet Code (2011), 12-year-old Flissy's World War II adventures continue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARGLASS by Phoebe North
YOUNG ADULT
Released: July 23, 2013

"For nail-biting suspense aboard a generation ship, see Beth Revis' Across the Universe (2011); but for Jewishness and gay characters in space, a poignantly lovely frame story about leaving Earth and a lonely kid seeking something to invest in, this is it. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
On a generation ship that left Earth 500 years ago, a teenager grapples with disillusionment and emotional isolation as her society nears the planet it intends to land on. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROMEO AND JULIET CODE by Phoebe Stone
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"The pacing is deliberately slow, yet Felicity's growing awareness of how she can help heal the troubled adults makes this an eminently satisfying read. (Historical fiction. 9-13)"
Eleven-year-old Londoner Felicity has been left by her parents, Danny and Winnie, for the duration of World War II at the mansion her grandmother, uncle and aunt share on a Maine bluff overlooking the sea. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GO AWAY, SHELLEY BOO! by Phoebe Stone
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Children will still identify with Emily's anxiety about a new neighbor and share her relief when she finally does meet the infamous 'Shelley Boo,' who is really named Elizabeth. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Emily Louise is certain that the new girl moving in next door will be simply awful. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Basquiat, despite the imposing swell of anecdote stirred up by Hoban, still comes across as little more than a colorful cipher."
As is only fitting, reporter and New York Times columnist Hoban's zippy biography of the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat is less concerned with art than culture. Read full book review >