Search Results: "Phyllis Grosskurth"


BOOK REVIEW

BYRON by Phyllis Grosskurth
NON-FICTION
Released: April 15, 1997

"But too often, unfortunately, Grosskurth's meticulous cataloguing of Byron's madness and badness deadens the reader to this mercurial sadist's attractiveness—that is, to what made him dangerous. (24 b&w photos, not seen)"
This fairly routine psychobiography adequately chronicles the life, loves, and poems of Romantic literature's most famous rake. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 17, 1991

"Freudians."
Aided by previously undisclosed correspondence, Grosskurth (Havelock Ellis, 1980, etc.; Humanities and Psychoanalytic Thought/Univ. of Toronto) takes the story of the brilliant, wildly neurotic men who contrived to safeguard Freudian thought and turns it into an intriguing psychological saga-cum-tragicomedy of manners. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BARTLEBY OF THE MIGHTY MISSISSIPPI by Phyllis Shalant
ADVENTURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"There are no interior illustrations, but the cover aptly conveys the final amiable relationship that is reached between Seezer and Bartleby when they realize they must put aside their opposite natures and work as a team to reach their final destination. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Shalant (The Great Eye, 1996, etc.) presents a delightful fantasy about a pet turtle named Bartleby who wants to return to his home in the Mississippi. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN PIRATES CAME TO BROOKLYN by Phyllis Shalant
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

After her best friend moves away, sixth-grader Lee Bloom meets some neighborhood children whose imaginative games fighting pirates in the attic of their home capture her imagination. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 6, 1996

"Thought-provoking reading on the creation of gender identity for anyone who has a child or has ever been one."
Calling for ``gender independence,'' freedom from the tyranny of masculine and feminine stereotypes, Burke (Family Values: Two Moms and Their Son, 1993; Atomic Candy, 1989) relies more on anecdote and example than on theory and sustained argument, thereby giving current discussions on gender a human face—and a wider audience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN AMERICAN BRIDE IN KABUL by Phyllis Chesler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Intelligent, powerful and timely."
A renowned psychotherapist's richly compelling memoir about how her experiences as an Afghan man's wife shaped her as both a feminist and human rights activist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"News junkies, except those from Philadelphia, may want to skim."
A worthy but exhausting case study of the 1991 Philadelphia mayoral election, in which reporters emphasized the horse race over substantive issues. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Likely to warm hearts, especially if read within sight of a nicely trimmed tree. But its shelf life will last about as long as fresh eggnog or raw chestnuts."
A children's writer spins a grown-up fable about a sleepy village that had a white Christmas—and was changed forever. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 11, 1999

"Curiously involving miniatures of five brave women who confronted, but did not always overcome, rigid social barriers. (5 b&w photos)"
Brief biographies of five Japanese women who challenged national mores and cultural expectations in the years before WWII. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BUTTER DID IT by Phyllis Richman
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 21, 1997

"Altogether, then, a flawed but intriguingly different and readable first outing."
A debut novel set in the competitive world of upscale restaurants in Washington, D.C. Chas Wheatley, a food critic for the Examiner, is shocked and unbelieving when her long-ago lover and longtime friend Laurence Levain, a master chef, is found dead in his apartment on the eve of the City Tastes gala, an annual event he founded. Read full book review >