Search Results: "Phyllis Tickle"


BOOK REVIEW

TICKLE by Leslie Patricelli
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 11, 2014

"Here's hoping this cheeky tyke never grows up so young readers and their delighted grown-ups can enjoy more adventures (and misadventures, too). (Board book. 6 mos.-3)"
Patricelli's mischievous, gender-indeterminate cherub claims to be tickle-proof, but readers know the giggles are inevitable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 17, 2001

"Thoughtful and instructive, but Tickle makes the faith she practices seem awfully easy, and in her depiction reality is almost uniformly sunny and inspiring."
Citing encounters with seminal individuals, transforming experiences, and enlightening epiphanies, noted religious authority Tickle (God-Talk in America, 1997) relates how she came to live a life shaped by prayer and spirituality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TICKLE TICKLE by Dakari Hru
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"Perfect just for reading, but even more promising for its play-along potential. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A toddler and his father play a tickling game that leaves them both laughing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Her intent is that her collection can be used by families of any religion. (Nonfiction. 2-5)"
The Divine Hours is a popular series of prayer manuals for adults written by Tickle, a well-known religious educator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOD-TALK IN AMERICA by Phyllis A. Tickle
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"A graphic expression of the superficiality of the current American religious situation."
Religious publishing, TV, and now the Internet have radically altered theological discourse in this country over the last 50 years, argues Tickle, who sees the developments as a vindication of all that the Reformation and American individualism stand for. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TICKLE, TICKLE! ITCH, TWITCH! by Julie Olson
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

A mischievous mouse plays a trick on a slumbering groundhog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"This is also an excellent choice for younger gifted children, who will enjoy the challenge of math problems with a humorous twist. (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
Math story problems aren't always boring exercises about dividing up a bowl of apples or trains traveling between cities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

APRIL FOOL, PHYLLIS! by Susanna Leonard Hill
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2011

"No fooling—here's a lighthearted romp that highlights an often overlooked holiday. (Picture book. 5-8)"
It's evident some things run in the family for the legendary Punxsutawney Phil's niece Phyllis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TICKLE MONSTER by Édouard Manceau
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Bonne nuit, chérie. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Matte black pages with blocks of solid geometric color and a white sans-serif type illustrate a small child's dialogue with an imaginary monster in the darkness before sleep. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TICKLE TUM! by Nancy van Laan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Whether or not they will actually consume their meals as a result of this rambunctious tale remains to be seen, but one thing is certain: Van Laan's culinary escapade is sure to leave them smiling. (Picture book. 1-5)"
With exuberant verse, Van Laan (When Winter Comes, 2000, etc.) cheerfully turns supper into child's play. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

"You Can't Tickle Me!" by T.C. Bartlett

"Provides a unique twist on an age-old monster in a beautifully presented book; however, certain aspects might scare off young children."
A young boy tries to outwit the enigmatic tickle monster in Bartlett's playful debut picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BOY NAMED PHYLLIS by Frank DeCaro
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1996

"While DeCaro can be an incisive observer, his book has about as much lasting resonance as one of his newspaper columns."
DeCaro, a humorist, newspaper columnist, and contributing editor of Martha Stewart Living, offers an insistently breezy memoir of growing up gay in New Jersey. Read full book review >